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Management Practices for Vegetable Production Against Climate Change


Affiliations
1 Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut (U.P.), India
2 C. S. A. University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur (U.P.), India
     

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Climate change is the primary cause of low production of most of the vegetables worldwide; reducing average yields for most of the major vegetables. Moreover, increasing temperatures, reduced irrigation-water availability, flooding, and salinity will be the major limiting factors in sustaining and increasing vegetable productivity. This article may contribute in improving the adaptation strategies of vegetable production to climate change for a sustainable horticulture due to an effective risk management by meeting the problems of possible crop management practices like mulching with crop residues and plastic mulches help in conserving soil moisture. Excessive soil moisture due to heavy rain becomes major problem that can be overcome by growing crops on raised beds. Development of genotypes tolerant to high temperature, moisture stress, salinity and climate proofing through conventional, non-conventional, breeding techniques, genomics and biotechnology etc. are essentially required to meet these challenges.
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  • Management Practices for Vegetable Production Against Climate Change

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Authors

Ashish Kumar
Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut (U.P.), India
Mohit Chaudhary
Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut (U.P.), India
Ankit Singh Bhadauria
C. S. A. University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur (U.P.), India
Shardulya Shukla
Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel University of Agriculture and Technology, Modipuram, Meerut (U.P.), India

Abstract


Climate change is the primary cause of low production of most of the vegetables worldwide; reducing average yields for most of the major vegetables. Moreover, increasing temperatures, reduced irrigation-water availability, flooding, and salinity will be the major limiting factors in sustaining and increasing vegetable productivity. This article may contribute in improving the adaptation strategies of vegetable production to climate change for a sustainable horticulture due to an effective risk management by meeting the problems of possible crop management practices like mulching with crop residues and plastic mulches help in conserving soil moisture. Excessive soil moisture due to heavy rain becomes major problem that can be overcome by growing crops on raised beds. Development of genotypes tolerant to high temperature, moisture stress, salinity and climate proofing through conventional, non-conventional, breeding techniques, genomics and biotechnology etc. are essentially required to meet these challenges.

References