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Today’s Party System in Indian Politics


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1 Regional Institute of Education (NCERT), Bhubaneswar-751022, India
     

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The paper aim at to reveal the present condition of the Indian political parties. Besides, it also highlightsthe polices and decisions taken for the country which is the outcome of their party’s political ideology. The Election Commission has tried to bring changes in the electoral process. Indian politics is a field of multi-party competition but the pattern through which the country is governed is all same whosoever party comes to power. Dynastic rule, splitting citizens by associating them with various castes and religion, and purchasing the media for election campaign etc. will remain common elements for various parties of Indian politics. The paradox of Indian democracy is that enlightened middle class has shown indifferent attitude towards electoral process. In the era of globalization, one is so deeply involved to fulfill his unending quench for attaining material pleasure that one fails to realize his larger national responsibility. Taking advantage of this attitude, political parties compromise with values, ethics, and morality to win elections.This raised the question that when the most educated and enlightened group will fail to fulfill their national obligation then how we can expect our political system to improve automatically.The question is whether Indian democracy has truly ensured the participation of every segment of the population in electoral process. Unless the fruits of democratic success are not shared with deprived and poorer section of the population, the goal of democracy cannot be said to be realized.

Keywords

Democracy, Coalitions, Party System, Participation, National Interest.
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  • Today’s Party System in Indian Politics

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Authors

Kalinga Ketaki
Regional Institute of Education (NCERT), Bhubaneswar-751022, India

Abstract


The paper aim at to reveal the present condition of the Indian political parties. Besides, it also highlightsthe polices and decisions taken for the country which is the outcome of their party’s political ideology. The Election Commission has tried to bring changes in the electoral process. Indian politics is a field of multi-party competition but the pattern through which the country is governed is all same whosoever party comes to power. Dynastic rule, splitting citizens by associating them with various castes and religion, and purchasing the media for election campaign etc. will remain common elements for various parties of Indian politics. The paradox of Indian democracy is that enlightened middle class has shown indifferent attitude towards electoral process. In the era of globalization, one is so deeply involved to fulfill his unending quench for attaining material pleasure that one fails to realize his larger national responsibility. Taking advantage of this attitude, political parties compromise with values, ethics, and morality to win elections.This raised the question that when the most educated and enlightened group will fail to fulfill their national obligation then how we can expect our political system to improve automatically.The question is whether Indian democracy has truly ensured the participation of every segment of the population in electoral process. Unless the fruits of democratic success are not shared with deprived and poorer section of the population, the goal of democracy cannot be said to be realized.

Keywords


Democracy, Coalitions, Party System, Participation, National Interest.

References