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Myths, Miracles and Legends:An Interpretation of Kashmiri Myth with Special Reference to Western Viewpoint


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1 Department of History, University of Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India
     

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The paper traces the characteristics of myth, legends and miraculous facts in Kashmir history. Myth is deeply related to cultural history of Kashmir. Since the beginning of Kashmir's history, the myth (Purakatha) has a great place. The origins of Kashmir, starting from the geographical location, the presence of public life, the construction of rivers, lakes, shrines, temples, mosques, and all matters of religious and societal transformation are closely related with myth and legends. In some cases, the myths also focus on the views of the individual or ruling classes. There are many myth, legend and miraculous facts about the Rishi and Sufi saints in Kashmir. This paper examines the theoretical concept of myth, miracle and legends which is emerged in western academics in the nineteenth and twentieth century. In this paper I shall try to analyse the truthfulness of myth, miracles and legends in Kashmir history through the theoretical concepts of world scholarship.

Keywords

Concept of Myth, Myth of Kashmir, Miracles in Kashmir, Legends of Kashmir, Folklore of Kashmir.
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  • Myths, Miracles and Legends:An Interpretation of Kashmiri Myth with Special Reference to Western Viewpoint

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Authors

Nakuleswar Mukherjee
Department of History, University of Kalyani, Nadia, West Bengal, India

Abstract


The paper traces the characteristics of myth, legends and miraculous facts in Kashmir history. Myth is deeply related to cultural history of Kashmir. Since the beginning of Kashmir's history, the myth (Purakatha) has a great place. The origins of Kashmir, starting from the geographical location, the presence of public life, the construction of rivers, lakes, shrines, temples, mosques, and all matters of religious and societal transformation are closely related with myth and legends. In some cases, the myths also focus on the views of the individual or ruling classes. There are many myth, legend and miraculous facts about the Rishi and Sufi saints in Kashmir. This paper examines the theoretical concept of myth, miracle and legends which is emerged in western academics in the nineteenth and twentieth century. In this paper I shall try to analyse the truthfulness of myth, miracles and legends in Kashmir history through the theoretical concepts of world scholarship.

Keywords


Concept of Myth, Myth of Kashmir, Miracles in Kashmir, Legends of Kashmir, Folklore of Kashmir.

References