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Study of Gender Difference on Ways of Coping, Mental Health and Rumination in People Living with HIV Positive


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychological Sciences, Central University of South Bihar, Gaya, India
2 University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
3 Guwahati, Assam, India
     

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Background: Despite the promising developments in medical science in recent years, the global HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to grow. It has gained prominence in India as a growing public health issue. India has the third largest HIV epidemic in the world. In 2017, HIV prevalence among adults (aged 15-49) was estimated 0.2% (UNAIDS 2017). Overall this highly heterogenic population is slowing down and concentrated among key affected population. However the vulnerabilities that drive the epidemic vary due to its strong ties with gender inequalities. Social response towards people living with HIV+ (PLWH) is accompanied with denial, stigma and discrimination which is relatively seen more in women (Brown et al., 2003, Hollen, 2010, Vlassoff et al., 2012). The available research evidences indicate that gender based disparities adversely affect the psychosocial correlates such as ways of coping, mental health and rumination in PLWH. Aim: To assess the gender difference between HIV+ males and females on their ways of coping, mental health, and rumination. Method: To carry out the research, purposive sampling was employed on 100 HIV+ patients including 50 males and 50 females. Results: The significant gender difference was found between HIV+ males and females on their ways of coping, mental health and rumination. Result indicated in comparison to their counterpart males were found to be associated more towards problem focused coping and positive mental health. On the other hand females scored higher on rumination whereas flow was found to be higher in males. Conclusion: The role of gender disparities was found to have a significant impact on ways of coping, mental health and rumination in HIV+ males and females.

Keywords

Gender and HIV+, Ways of Coping, Mental health, Rumination.
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  • Study of Gender Difference on Ways of Coping, Mental Health and Rumination in People Living with HIV Positive

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Authors

Chetna Jaiswal
Department of Psychological Sciences, Central University of South Bihar, Gaya, India
Narsingh Kumar
Department of Psychological Sciences, Central University of South Bihar, Gaya, India
Usha Kulshrestha
University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
Shivangi Gupta
Guwahati, Assam, India

Abstract


Background: Despite the promising developments in medical science in recent years, the global HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to grow. It has gained prominence in India as a growing public health issue. India has the third largest HIV epidemic in the world. In 2017, HIV prevalence among adults (aged 15-49) was estimated 0.2% (UNAIDS 2017). Overall this highly heterogenic population is slowing down and concentrated among key affected population. However the vulnerabilities that drive the epidemic vary due to its strong ties with gender inequalities. Social response towards people living with HIV+ (PLWH) is accompanied with denial, stigma and discrimination which is relatively seen more in women (Brown et al., 2003, Hollen, 2010, Vlassoff et al., 2012). The available research evidences indicate that gender based disparities adversely affect the psychosocial correlates such as ways of coping, mental health and rumination in PLWH. Aim: To assess the gender difference between HIV+ males and females on their ways of coping, mental health, and rumination. Method: To carry out the research, purposive sampling was employed on 100 HIV+ patients including 50 males and 50 females. Results: The significant gender difference was found between HIV+ males and females on their ways of coping, mental health and rumination. Result indicated in comparison to their counterpart males were found to be associated more towards problem focused coping and positive mental health. On the other hand females scored higher on rumination whereas flow was found to be higher in males. Conclusion: The role of gender disparities was found to have a significant impact on ways of coping, mental health and rumination in HIV+ males and females.

Keywords


Gender and HIV+, Ways of Coping, Mental health, Rumination.

References