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Temporal Interval as a Function of Prospective Judgment of Time Perception


Affiliations
1 Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
2 Department of Psychology, Vasanta Kanya Mahavidhyalaya, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
     

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The present study was intended to explore the effect of time durations on time perception using prospective judgment of time paradigm. The dual task paradigm was used for the study. The primary task was intended to estimate elapsed time while performing the executive task and secondary task was design to measure executive performance. A reproduction method was used to estimate the time judgment of the participants. Thirty five students from Banaras Hindu University were taken as participants with age ranged from of 20 to 26 years (21.51 years, SD=1.50). Ratio and Absolute error was derived from observed reproduction of time and considered as dependent measure. The findings reveled that Accuracy of time estimation is better under short time duration in comparison to medium and long time duration. Further, it was also found that participants underestimated the period of time-on- task more under longer duration condition in comparison to medium and short time duration of executive task.

Keywords

Time Perception, Prospective Judgment, Reproduction, Duration, Executive Task.
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  • Temporal Interval as a Function of Prospective Judgment of Time Perception

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Authors

Vishal Yadav
Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Tarun Mishra
Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Trayambak Tiwari
Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Tara Singh
Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Indramani L. Singh
Cognitive Science Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Anju Lata Singh
Department of Psychology, Vasanta Kanya Mahavidhyalaya, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India

Abstract


The present study was intended to explore the effect of time durations on time perception using prospective judgment of time paradigm. The dual task paradigm was used for the study. The primary task was intended to estimate elapsed time while performing the executive task and secondary task was design to measure executive performance. A reproduction method was used to estimate the time judgment of the participants. Thirty five students from Banaras Hindu University were taken as participants with age ranged from of 20 to 26 years (21.51 years, SD=1.50). Ratio and Absolute error was derived from observed reproduction of time and considered as dependent measure. The findings reveled that Accuracy of time estimation is better under short time duration in comparison to medium and long time duration. Further, it was also found that participants underestimated the period of time-on- task more under longer duration condition in comparison to medium and short time duration of executive task.

Keywords


Time Perception, Prospective Judgment, Reproduction, Duration, Executive Task.

References