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Globalization:The Third Eye in Drug Marketing


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1 Department of Sociology, A.M.U-Aligarh, India
     

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Globalization has extended and facilitated not only the movement of people, but also the flow of goods, capital, and services. The world started to have a new shape, and nation states became more interdependent with each other. Major changes, like the expansion of markets and openness to trade set the basis for a global economy in which billions of people are participating today. Growth of international commerce, the exporting of jobs from developed to underdeveloped countries, along with advances in farming, access to food, medicine, and sanitation have all been generally positive effects of globalization. However, not all its consequences have been positive. Globalization has also the negative effect of facilitating the expansion of transnational crime such as global terrorism, people and drug trafficking, immigrant smuggling and money laundering. Despite the great advancement we have witnessed, the world’s governments and population were not ready to support the level that globalization reached in such a short period of time. The growing income inequality has prompted an increase in migration and a growing market for human smugglers and traffickers. Nation states were unprepared to control mass movements of people and experienced social fragmentation and economic dislocations. The focus of present study is to discuss how globalization influenced transnational crime by examining global drifts in drug production and trafficking, and the rise of new paths for drug smuggling and new markets for retail sales. This examination will form the base for arguing that globalization eased the expansion of narcotrafficking, and therefore caused instability, corruption, and high levels of violence on producing and transit countries.

Keywords

Globalization, Crime, Drug Production, Drug Trafficking.
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  • Globalization:The Third Eye in Drug Marketing

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Authors

Sumbl Ahmad Khanday
Department of Sociology, A.M.U-Aligarh, India

Abstract


Globalization has extended and facilitated not only the movement of people, but also the flow of goods, capital, and services. The world started to have a new shape, and nation states became more interdependent with each other. Major changes, like the expansion of markets and openness to trade set the basis for a global economy in which billions of people are participating today. Growth of international commerce, the exporting of jobs from developed to underdeveloped countries, along with advances in farming, access to food, medicine, and sanitation have all been generally positive effects of globalization. However, not all its consequences have been positive. Globalization has also the negative effect of facilitating the expansion of transnational crime such as global terrorism, people and drug trafficking, immigrant smuggling and money laundering. Despite the great advancement we have witnessed, the world’s governments and population were not ready to support the level that globalization reached in such a short period of time. The growing income inequality has prompted an increase in migration and a growing market for human smugglers and traffickers. Nation states were unprepared to control mass movements of people and experienced social fragmentation and economic dislocations. The focus of present study is to discuss how globalization influenced transnational crime by examining global drifts in drug production and trafficking, and the rise of new paths for drug smuggling and new markets for retail sales. This examination will form the base for arguing that globalization eased the expansion of narcotrafficking, and therefore caused instability, corruption, and high levels of violence on producing and transit countries.

Keywords


Globalization, Crime, Drug Production, Drug Trafficking.

References