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Personality, Stress and Coping in Indian Adolescents:A Correlation Model


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, Mithibai College of Arts, Vile Parle (W), Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Psychology, Delhi Public School, Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India
     

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Adolescents confront several stressors in their environment, and the distressing events trigger physical and mental illnesses. Differences in their coping responses are partly controlled by personality; partly influenced by social observation. This study examines a correlational model between personality, stress and coping strategies in 154 school-going, upper-economic strata children in a private school of Ahmedabad. Bi-variate correlations and t-test analysis reveal significant correlations between personality traits and stress. Findings report that extrovert and conscientious personalities experience least stress; however the former prefers problem-focused coping while the latter prefers emotion-focused coping. Personalities high on neuroticism experience high stress, with no gender difference and report no significant preference for a specific coping strategy. While no gender difference is reported in the experience of stress, there is a gender difference between their choice of coping styles. Males have reported a mixed preference of problem and emotion focused coping while females indicate preference for emotion-focused coping largely. Implications for adolescent mental health practitioners and scope for further research is discussed.

Keywords

Stress, Adolescence, Personality, Coping, Stress and Coping, Indian Adolescents.
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  • Personality, Stress and Coping in Indian Adolescents:A Correlation Model

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Authors

Khushali Adhiya-Shah
Department of Psychology, Mithibai College of Arts, Vile Parle (W), Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Suman Trivedi
Department of Psychology, Delhi Public School, Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India

Abstract


Adolescents confront several stressors in their environment, and the distressing events trigger physical and mental illnesses. Differences in their coping responses are partly controlled by personality; partly influenced by social observation. This study examines a correlational model between personality, stress and coping strategies in 154 school-going, upper-economic strata children in a private school of Ahmedabad. Bi-variate correlations and t-test analysis reveal significant correlations between personality traits and stress. Findings report that extrovert and conscientious personalities experience least stress; however the former prefers problem-focused coping while the latter prefers emotion-focused coping. Personalities high on neuroticism experience high stress, with no gender difference and report no significant preference for a specific coping strategy. While no gender difference is reported in the experience of stress, there is a gender difference between their choice of coping styles. Males have reported a mixed preference of problem and emotion focused coping while females indicate preference for emotion-focused coping largely. Implications for adolescent mental health practitioners and scope for further research is discussed.

Keywords


Stress, Adolescence, Personality, Coping, Stress and Coping, Indian Adolescents.

References