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Impact of Self Help Groups on Women Empowerment: A Case Study of Puri District, Odisha


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1 M.P.C. Autonomous College, Baripada, Odisha, India
 

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Self Help Groups (SHGs) are meant to empower women both socially and economically. They encourage women to participate in decision making in the household, community and local domestic sector and prepare rural women to take up leadership positions. This study examines the pre-SHG and post-SHG status of rural SHG members in Puri district of Odisha. On the basis of primary data analysis, the study finds that SHGs have not only produced tangible assets and improved the living conditions of the members, but has also helped in changing much of their social outlook and attitudes. In the study area, SHGs have served the cause of women empowerment, social solidarity and socio-economic betterment of the rural poor.

Keywords

Self Help Groups (SHGs), Women Empowerment, Employment, Puri District.
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  • Impact of Self Help Groups on Women Empowerment: A Case Study of Puri District, Odisha

Abstract Views: 1315  |  PDF Views: 23

Authors

K. C. Mishra
M.P.C. Autonomous College, Baripada, Odisha, India

Abstract


Self Help Groups (SHGs) are meant to empower women both socially and economically. They encourage women to participate in decision making in the household, community and local domestic sector and prepare rural women to take up leadership positions. This study examines the pre-SHG and post-SHG status of rural SHG members in Puri district of Odisha. On the basis of primary data analysis, the study finds that SHGs have not only produced tangible assets and improved the living conditions of the members, but has also helped in changing much of their social outlook and attitudes. In the study area, SHGs have served the cause of women empowerment, social solidarity and socio-economic betterment of the rural poor.

Keywords


Self Help Groups (SHGs), Women Empowerment, Employment, Puri District.

References