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Isolation, Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli Serotypes in Chickens in Maiduguri, Nigeria


Affiliations
1 Department of Food Science and Technology, Ramat Polytechnic Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
2 Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
3 Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
4 Department of Microbiology, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
     

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This study was carried out in Maiduguri to isolate, characterize and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in broilers and village chickens faeces. Conventional microbiology culture, phenotypical characterization, and biochemical test were used. Three hundred (300) (150 each of broiler and village chickens) faecal samples were randomly collected from chickens brought to the Maiduguri Monday Market Chicken slaughterhouse. A total of 83 (27.7%) E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 36(24%) from broiler chickens and 47(31.3%) from village chickens. The E.coli positive isolates were then serotyped based on their somatic ‘O’ antigen using latex agglutination test for O157 STEC and dry spot polyvalent Sero-check for Non-O157 STEC. Total of 19 (12.7%) and 26 (17.3%) were O157 STEC; while 8(5.3%) and 9(6%) were non-O157 STEC for both broilers and village chickens respectively. The remaining E. coli isolates 9(6%) from broiler chickens, and 12(8%) from village chickens were untypable using the conventional sero kits. The result of the antimicrobial sensitivity test using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute Guide revealed that the STEC isolates were susceptible to the antibiotics. With high susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin (100%), Ceftriaxone (98%) and Gentamicin (100%) and low susceptibility to Trimethoprim (79%), Chloramphenicol (66.6%) and resistant to cefodizime (73.1%) and Ampicillin (75%).

Keywords

Broiler Chickens, Village Chickens, Shiga Toxin-Producing E.Coli, Stx1, Stx2, O157, Non O157, Antimicrobial Susceptibility.
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  • Isolation, Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli Serotypes in Chickens in Maiduguri, Nigeria

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Authors

Falmata A. Abadam
Department of Food Science and Technology, Ramat Polytechnic Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Dahiru El. Yuguda
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Yagub A. Geidam
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Isa A. Gulani
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Lawan Adamu
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria
Mustafa Alhaji Isa
Department of Microbiology, University of Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria

Abstract


This study was carried out in Maiduguri to isolate, characterize and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in broilers and village chickens faeces. Conventional microbiology culture, phenotypical characterization, and biochemical test were used. Three hundred (300) (150 each of broiler and village chickens) faecal samples were randomly collected from chickens brought to the Maiduguri Monday Market Chicken slaughterhouse. A total of 83 (27.7%) E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 36(24%) from broiler chickens and 47(31.3%) from village chickens. The E.coli positive isolates were then serotyped based on their somatic ‘O’ antigen using latex agglutination test for O157 STEC and dry spot polyvalent Sero-check for Non-O157 STEC. Total of 19 (12.7%) and 26 (17.3%) were O157 STEC; while 8(5.3%) and 9(6%) were non-O157 STEC for both broilers and village chickens respectively. The remaining E. coli isolates 9(6%) from broiler chickens, and 12(8%) from village chickens were untypable using the conventional sero kits. The result of the antimicrobial sensitivity test using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute Guide revealed that the STEC isolates were susceptible to the antibiotics. With high susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin (100%), Ceftriaxone (98%) and Gentamicin (100%) and low susceptibility to Trimethoprim (79%), Chloramphenicol (66.6%) and resistant to cefodizime (73.1%) and Ampicillin (75%).

Keywords


Broiler Chickens, Village Chickens, Shiga Toxin-Producing E.Coli, Stx1, Stx2, O157, Non O157, Antimicrobial Susceptibility.

References