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Immediate Effect of Deep Neck Muscles Activation on Migraine Headaches in Students


Affiliations
1 BPT, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences "Deemed To Be University", Karad, Maharashtra, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Neurosciences, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences "Deemed to be University", Karad, Maharashtra, India
 

Background: Migraine is a common episodic neurological disorder with complex pathophysiology that manifests as recurrent attacks of typically throbbing and unilateral, often severe headache with associated features such as nausea, phonophobia, and photophobia. It has been found that neck pain has a significant link with migraine headaches. It is necessary to provide an adjunctive treatment to help reduce the occurrence and adverse effects of migraine headaches. This study aims to establish the effect of neck muscles activation on migraine headaches in students. Aim: To determine the immediate effect of deep neck muscles activation on migraine headaches in students. Methods: A total 35 subjects between 18–25 years diagnosed with migraine were selected for study. Subjects received exercises for deep neck muscle activation. Each session was conducted for 30 minutes duration, 4 days per week for 3 weeks. Outcome measure used was Migraine Disability Index scale (MIDAS). Statiscal Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using unpaired t test. Results: The results of the study demonstrate that there was a significant effect of the deep neck muscles activation on MIDAS scores (p = 0.0031), frequency of headaches (p = 0.0138) and intensity of pain experienced during migraine headaches (p<0.0001) during the pre and post intervention assessment. Conclusion: Activation of deep neck muscles effectively reduced the disability caused by migraine, frequency of headaches and intensity of pain experienced during migraine headaches in students.

Keywords

Deep Neck Muscles Activation, Migraine, Migraine Disability Index Scale, Students.
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  • Immediate Effect of Deep Neck Muscles Activation on Migraine Headaches in Students

Abstract Views: 34  |  PDF Views: 30

Authors

Divya S. Gupta
BPT, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences "Deemed To Be University", Karad, Maharashtra, India
Suraj B. Kanase
Associate Professor, Department of Neurosciences, Department of Physiotherapy, Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences "Deemed to be University", Karad, Maharashtra, India

Abstract


Background: Migraine is a common episodic neurological disorder with complex pathophysiology that manifests as recurrent attacks of typically throbbing and unilateral, often severe headache with associated features such as nausea, phonophobia, and photophobia. It has been found that neck pain has a significant link with migraine headaches. It is necessary to provide an adjunctive treatment to help reduce the occurrence and adverse effects of migraine headaches. This study aims to establish the effect of neck muscles activation on migraine headaches in students. Aim: To determine the immediate effect of deep neck muscles activation on migraine headaches in students. Methods: A total 35 subjects between 18–25 years diagnosed with migraine were selected for study. Subjects received exercises for deep neck muscle activation. Each session was conducted for 30 minutes duration, 4 days per week for 3 weeks. Outcome measure used was Migraine Disability Index scale (MIDAS). Statiscal Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using unpaired t test. Results: The results of the study demonstrate that there was a significant effect of the deep neck muscles activation on MIDAS scores (p = 0.0031), frequency of headaches (p = 0.0138) and intensity of pain experienced during migraine headaches (p<0.0001) during the pre and post intervention assessment. Conclusion: Activation of deep neck muscles effectively reduced the disability caused by migraine, frequency of headaches and intensity of pain experienced during migraine headaches in students.

Keywords


Deep Neck Muscles Activation, Migraine, Migraine Disability Index Scale, Students.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18311/jeoh%2F2021%2F28394