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Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir Bypassing Genotypic Investigation of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: A Real-Life Experience at Tertiary care center in North Indian Population Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir Bypassing Genotypic Investigation


Affiliations
1 Experimental and Public Health Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow – 226007, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Medicine, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow – 226003, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of Medical Gastroenterology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow – 226003, Uttar Pradesh, India
 

Background and Aims: The goal of Hepatitis C Virus infection treatment is to remove the virus, to avoid advancement of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and progression of related disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and to achieve End of Treatment Response (ETR) with 12-week therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR) at post-treatment week 12 (SVR-12), which is defined as undetectable HCV RNA at 12 weeks post ETR. In the Compassionate Use Program (CUP) in Europe, Sofosbuvir (SOF) and Daclatasvir (DCV) were used in all genotypes and achieved SVR-12. Aims: Our aim is to compare the efficacy and effectiveness of Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in the treatment of HCV infection in the patients who could not afford for the investigating of HCVGenotype and to those in whom genotyping was done. Methods: Group 1 includes ten patients, given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir without genotype and group 2 includes nine patients, given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir with genotype. The patient group selection was done using a randomized table generated by using excel. All the patients in the groups completed the twelve weeks treatment with twelve weeks and twenty-four weeks of follow up. All the nineteen patients were given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir for twelve weeks and the endpoint of therapy was marked by undetectable HCV-RNA in blood by ETR-12 (end of treatment response), Sustained Virological Response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR-12) and Sustained Virological Response at post-treatment week 24 (SVR- 24). Results: Quantitative HCV-RNA (IU/ml) by RT-PCR was undetectable in all the patients in both groups at the end of treatment (ETR-12) and SVR-12- and SVR-24-weeks follow-up after completion of treatment i.e. Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir has 100% ETR-12, SVR-12 and SVR-24 in both the groups. Conclusion: If patients do not investigate for genotype and use the Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in HCV infected patients, there is no effect on outcome ETR. This will reduce the risk of late stage complications such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and will also leads to the economic benefits such as no extra burden on patients.

Keywords

Cirrhosis, End of Treatment Response (ETR), Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir (SOF+DCV), Steatosis, Sustained Virological Response (SVR).
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  • Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir Bypassing Genotypic Investigation of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: A Real-Life Experience at Tertiary care center in North Indian Population Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir Bypassing Genotypic Investigation

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Authors

Amar Deep
Experimental and Public Health Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow – 226007, Uttar Pradesh, India
Ajay Kumar
Department of Medicine, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow – 226003, Uttar Pradesh, India
Sumit Rungta
Department of Medical Gastroenterology, King George’s Medical University, Lucknow – 226003, Uttar Pradesh, India
Suchit Swaroop
Experimental and Public Health Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow – 226007, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract


Background and Aims: The goal of Hepatitis C Virus infection treatment is to remove the virus, to avoid advancement of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and progression of related disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and to achieve End of Treatment Response (ETR) with 12-week therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR) at post-treatment week 12 (SVR-12), which is defined as undetectable HCV RNA at 12 weeks post ETR. In the Compassionate Use Program (CUP) in Europe, Sofosbuvir (SOF) and Daclatasvir (DCV) were used in all genotypes and achieved SVR-12. Aims: Our aim is to compare the efficacy and effectiveness of Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in the treatment of HCV infection in the patients who could not afford for the investigating of HCVGenotype and to those in whom genotyping was done. Methods: Group 1 includes ten patients, given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir without genotype and group 2 includes nine patients, given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir with genotype. The patient group selection was done using a randomized table generated by using excel. All the patients in the groups completed the twelve weeks treatment with twelve weeks and twenty-four weeks of follow up. All the nineteen patients were given Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir for twelve weeks and the endpoint of therapy was marked by undetectable HCV-RNA in blood by ETR-12 (end of treatment response), Sustained Virological Response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR-12) and Sustained Virological Response at post-treatment week 24 (SVR- 24). Results: Quantitative HCV-RNA (IU/ml) by RT-PCR was undetectable in all the patients in both groups at the end of treatment (ETR-12) and SVR-12- and SVR-24-weeks follow-up after completion of treatment i.e. Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir has 100% ETR-12, SVR-12 and SVR-24 in both the groups. Conclusion: If patients do not investigate for genotype and use the Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in HCV infected patients, there is no effect on outcome ETR. This will reduce the risk of late stage complications such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and will also leads to the economic benefits such as no extra burden on patients.

Keywords


Cirrhosis, End of Treatment Response (ETR), Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC), Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir (SOF+DCV), Steatosis, Sustained Virological Response (SVR).

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18311/jeoh%2F2020%2F24450