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Mining Activity and its Impact on the Environment:Study from Makrana Marble and Jodhpur Sandstone Mining Areas of Rajasthan


Affiliations
1 Regional Remote Sensing Service Centre, Dept. of Space, CAZRI Campus, Jodhpur - 342 003, India
2 Department of Mines and Geology, Govt. of Rajasthan, Jodhpur, India
     

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Remote sensing and GIS techniques have been found to be useful in mapping of mining areas, management of mineral resources and environmental impact analysis. These techniques help to monitor dynamic growth of mine areas and assess environmental impact caused by the mining activity. In the present study, multi-temporal satellite data have been used for mine area mapping and the environmental impact in Makrana marble and Jodhpur sandstone mines. Based on the satellite data analysis for the year 2003, the mining area of Makrana marble and Jodhpur sandstone has been estimated as 3.13 sq. km and 17.35 sq. km respectively. Mine mapping shows 495 smaller (<10000 sq. m) mines in Makrana and only 22 mines of same dimension in Jodhpur area. Department of Mines and Geology, Rajasthan allotted 817 lease areas (2.51 sq. km) in Makrana and 11948 lease areas (21.5 sq. km) in Jodhpur mining area. This indicates a vertical growth of mining activity for Makrana marble and lateral growth for Jodhpur sandstone. In the last 10-15 years, Jodhpur mining activity caused more damage on the natural drainage (destruction of 27.4 km length) in comparison to the damage on drainage (only 1.66 km length) in Makrana. Sandstone mining also paralyzed 50% of the Main Keru Canal in Jodhpur area. The present analysis indicates that unscientific and non-Mechanized methods in smaller mines pose threat to the environment, life and property. Hence, it is suggested that smaller and clustered mines need to be amalgamated through Co-Operative society for proper extraction of precious mineral resources and better environmental management.

Keywords

Mine Mapping, Mineral Resources, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Satellite Data, Makrana Marble, Jodhpur Sandstone, Rajasthan.
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  • Mining Activity and its Impact on the Environment:Study from Makrana Marble and Jodhpur Sandstone Mining Areas of Rajasthan

Abstract Views: 144  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

B. K. Bhadra
Regional Remote Sensing Service Centre, Dept. of Space, CAZRI Campus, Jodhpur - 342 003, India
A. K. Gupta
Regional Remote Sensing Service Centre, Dept. of Space, CAZRI Campus, Jodhpur - 342 003, India
J. R. Sharma
Regional Remote Sensing Service Centre, Dept. of Space, CAZRI Campus, Jodhpur - 342 003, India
B. R. Choudhary
Department of Mines and Geology, Govt. of Rajasthan, Jodhpur, India

Abstract


Remote sensing and GIS techniques have been found to be useful in mapping of mining areas, management of mineral resources and environmental impact analysis. These techniques help to monitor dynamic growth of mine areas and assess environmental impact caused by the mining activity. In the present study, multi-temporal satellite data have been used for mine area mapping and the environmental impact in Makrana marble and Jodhpur sandstone mines. Based on the satellite data analysis for the year 2003, the mining area of Makrana marble and Jodhpur sandstone has been estimated as 3.13 sq. km and 17.35 sq. km respectively. Mine mapping shows 495 smaller (<10000 sq. m) mines in Makrana and only 22 mines of same dimension in Jodhpur area. Department of Mines and Geology, Rajasthan allotted 817 lease areas (2.51 sq. km) in Makrana and 11948 lease areas (21.5 sq. km) in Jodhpur mining area. This indicates a vertical growth of mining activity for Makrana marble and lateral growth for Jodhpur sandstone. In the last 10-15 years, Jodhpur mining activity caused more damage on the natural drainage (destruction of 27.4 km length) in comparison to the damage on drainage (only 1.66 km length) in Makrana. Sandstone mining also paralyzed 50% of the Main Keru Canal in Jodhpur area. The present analysis indicates that unscientific and non-Mechanized methods in smaller mines pose threat to the environment, life and property. Hence, it is suggested that smaller and clustered mines need to be amalgamated through Co-Operative society for proper extraction of precious mineral resources and better environmental management.

Keywords


Mine Mapping, Mineral Resources, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Satellite Data, Makrana Marble, Jodhpur Sandstone, Rajasthan.