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A Cross Sectional Study to Asses Factors Affecting Family Planning Practices in Two Semiurban Communities of a Developing Country


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1 School of Public Health, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
     

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India is the first country that adopted an official family planning programme, in 1952. Despite concerted efforts we have failed in controlling population.

OBJECTIVE: A cross sectional study was conducted to ascertain family planning practices in married females of two semiurban communities in Pune and determinants thereof.

STUDY AREA: Unit of study was a married woman in reproductive age group 16-45 years.

METHODOLOGY: A close-ended, pre tested structured interview schedule was prepared. Face to face interview was conducted. Data was analyzed in EPI 2002.

RESULTS: Knowledge about contraception was present in 98% however prevalence of use was 57.87%. Tubectomy was the most common method practiced. Contraceptive use varied significantly with education of respondent, education of spouse, socioeconomic status, husband wife communication and religion. The issues leading to a wide gap between knowledge and practice of contraception by females need to be addressed. There is no role of family type in acceptance of contraception.


Keywords

Family Planning, Contraception, Education, Husband Wife Communication, Family Type
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  • A Cross Sectional Study to Asses Factors Affecting Family Planning Practices in Two Semiurban Communities of a Developing Country

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Authors

Puja Dudeja
School of Public Health, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
Sukhbir Singh
School of Public Health, PGIMER, Chandigarh, India

Abstract


India is the first country that adopted an official family planning programme, in 1952. Despite concerted efforts we have failed in controlling population.

OBJECTIVE: A cross sectional study was conducted to ascertain family planning practices in married females of two semiurban communities in Pune and determinants thereof.

STUDY AREA: Unit of study was a married woman in reproductive age group 16-45 years.

METHODOLOGY: A close-ended, pre tested structured interview schedule was prepared. Face to face interview was conducted. Data was analyzed in EPI 2002.

RESULTS: Knowledge about contraception was present in 98% however prevalence of use was 57.87%. Tubectomy was the most common method practiced. Contraceptive use varied significantly with education of respondent, education of spouse, socioeconomic status, husband wife communication and religion. The issues leading to a wide gap between knowledge and practice of contraception by females need to be addressed. There is no role of family type in acceptance of contraception.


Keywords


Family Planning, Contraception, Education, Husband Wife Communication, Family Type

References