Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access
Open Access Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Restricted Access Subscription Access

Status of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) in Nurseries of Willow, Poplar and Pine Seedlings in Himachal Pradesh


Affiliations
1 Department of Plant Pathology, Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (H.P.), India
     

   Subscribe/Renew Journal


Poplar and willow are economically-important, fast-growing tree species with the ability to colonize nutrient-poor environments. Willow (Salix sp.) offers a great potential as a source of renewable energy and for bioremediation and polluted environments. To initiate a study on the possible contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to this ability, we isolated mycorrhial fungi from in and around the rhizosphere of native poplar (Populus sp.), willow (Salix sp.) and pine (Pinus sp.) seedlings grown in research nurseries at Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan (H.P.). Several species of mycorrhizal fungi grew well in the rhizosphere of these trees, were characterized based on morphological studies. The number of spores per 50 g of rhizosphere soil from pinus, willow and poplar were found to be 1380, 1290, 1300 and 540, 490, 530 spores at 106 µ and 250 µ mesh sieves, respectively. The presence of these AM fungi may help explain the ability of these pioneering tree species to grow under nitrogen limitation. Their presence will be helpful in mitigating the losses due to soil borne diseases as well as enhancing the plant vigor.

Keywords

VAM (Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza), Poplar, Willow, Pine, Salix, Rhizosphere.
Subscription Login to verify subscription
User
Notifications
Font Size


  • Akema, T. and Futai, K. (2005).Ectomycorrhizal development in a Pinus thunbergii stand in relation to location on a slope and effect on tree mortality from pine wilt disease. J. For. Res. 10 : 93–99.
  • Azcon-Aguilar, C., Jaizme-Vega, M.C. and Calvet, C. (2002). The Contribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi for Bioremediation. In: Mycorrhizal Technology in Agriculture.From Genes to Bioproducts, Gianinazzi, S., H. Schuepp, J.M. Barea and K. Haselwandter (Eds.). Birkhauser Verlag, Berlin, ISBN-10: 0-89054-245-71, pp: 187-197.
  • Baum, C., Weih, M., Verwijst, T. and Makeschin, F. (2002). The effects of nitrogen fertilization and soil properties on mycorrhizal formation ofSalix viminalis. Forest Ecol Manage, 160 : 35-43.
  • Baum, C., Hrynkiewicz, K., Leinweber, P. and Meibner, R.(2006).Heavy-metal mobilization and uptake by mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal willows (Salix x dasyclados). J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci., 169 : 516–522.
  • Benny, G.L., Humber, R.A. and Morton, J.B. (2001).Zygomycota: Zygomycetes, Mycota vii. Internat. J. Systematic & Evolutionary Microbiol., 7: 113-146.
  • Bodker, L., Kjoller, R. and Rosendahl, S. (1998).Effect of phosphate and Arbuscular mycorrizhal fungus Glomus intraradices on disease severity of root rot of peas (Pisum Sativum) caused by Aphanomyces euteiches. Mycorrhiza, 8: 169-174.
  • Bougher, N.L., Grove, T.S. and Malajczuk, N. (1990).Growth and phosphorus acquisition of karri (Eucalyptus diversicolor F. Muell.) seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi in relation to phosphorus supply. New Phytol., 114 : 77–85.
  • Dehne, H.W. (1982).Interaction between vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant pathogens. J. Phytopath., 72 (Suppl 8): 1115-1119.
  • Dosskey, M.G., Linderman, R.G. and Boersma, L. (1990). Carbon sink stimulation of photosynthesis in Douglas fir seedlings by some ectomycorrhizas. New Phytol., 115 : 269– 274.
  • Gerdemann, J.W. and Nicolson, T.H. (1963).Spores of mycorrhizal endogoene species extracted from soil by wet sieving and decanting. Trans. Brit. Mycol. Soc., 46: 235-244.
  • Gosling, P., Hodge, A., Goodlass, G. and Bending, G.D. (2006). Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and organic farming. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 113: 17-35.
  • Hall, I.R. and Fish, B.J. (1979).A key to Endogonaceae. Tans. Brit. Mycol. Soc., 73: 261-270.
  • Harrier, L.A. and Waston, C.A. (2004).The Potential role of Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi in the bioprotection of plants against soil-borne pathogens in organic and/or other sustainable farming systems. Pest Mgmt. Sci., 60(Suppl 2): 149-157.
  • Heinemeyer, A., Hartley, I.P., Evans, S.P., De la Fuente, J.A.C. and Ineson, P. (2007).Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas. Glob Change Biol., 13 : 1786-1797.
  • Heslin, M.C. and Douglas, G.C. (1986). Effects of ectomycorrhizal fungi on growth and development of poplar derived from tissue culture. Sci. Hort., 30 : 143–149.
  • Hrynkiewicz, K., Ciesielska, A., Haug, I. and Baum, C. (2010). Conditionality of ectomycorrhiza formation and willow growth promotion by associated bacteria: role of microbial metabolites and use of C sources. Biol. Fertil. Soils, 46:139–150.
  • Jones, M.D., Durall, D.M. and Tinker, P.B. (1990). Phosphorus relationships and production of extramatrical hyphae by two types of willow ectomycorrhizas at different soil phosphorus levels. New Phytol., 115 : 259–267.
  • Jones, M.D., Durall, D.M. and Tinker, P.B. (1991).Fluxes of carbon and phosphorus between symbionts in willow ectomycorrhizas and their changes with time. New Phytol., 119 : 99–106.
  • Labrecque, M., Teodorescu, T. and Daigle, S. (1995).Effect of wastewater sludge on growth and heavy metal bioaccumulation of two Salix species. Plant & Soil, 171: 303-316.
  • Lakhanpal, T.N. (2000).Ectomycorrhiza-an overview. In: Mukerji, K.G., Chamola, B.P. and Singhm J. (eds.), Mycorrhizal Biology. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum, 336 pp. 101– 118.
  • Martins, A., Casimiro, A. and Pais, M.S. (1997).Influence of mycorrhization on physiological parameters of Castanea sativa Mill micro propagated plants. Mycorrhiza, 7: 161–165.
  • Meharg, A.A. and Cairney, J.W.G. (2000).Ectomycorrhizas-extending the capabilities of rhizosphere remediation. Soil Biol. Biochem., 32 : 1475–1484.
  • Morton, J.B. and Redecker, D. (2001).Two new families of Glomales, Archaeosporaceae and Paraglomaceae, with two new genera Archaeospora and Paraglomus, based on concordant molecular and morphological characters. Mycologia, 93: 181-195.
  • Mukerji, K.G. (1996).Taxomony of endomycorrhizal fungi. p.213-221. (Eds). K.G. Mukerji, K.G. Mathur, B ; Chambola, B.P and Chitralekha, P. Advances in Botany. APH Publication Corporation, New Delhi.
  • Nara, K. and Hogetsu, T. (2004).Ectomycorrhizal fungi on established shrubs facilitate subsequent seedling establishment of successional plant species. Ecology, 85: 1700–1707.
  • Nara, K. (2006).Pioneer dwarf willow may facilitate tree succession by providing late colonizers with compatible ectomycorrhizal fungi in a primary successional volcanic desert. New Phytol., 171: 187–198.
  • Omar, M.B., Bollard, L. and Heather, W.A. (1979).A permanent mounting medium for fungi. Bull. Bri. Mycol. Soc., 13: 31.
  • Reid, C.P.P., Kidd, F.A. and Ekwebelam, S.A. (1983).Nitrogen nutrition, photosynthesis and carbon allocation in ectomycorrhizal pine. Plant Soil, 71: 415–432.
  • Rousseau, J.V.D. and Reid, C.P.P. (1990).Effects of phosphorus and ectomycorrhizas on the carbon balance of loblolly pine seedlings. Forest Sci., 36 : 101–112.
  • Sell, J., Kayser, A., Schulin, R. and Brunner, I. (2005). Contribution of ectomycorrhizal fungi to cadmium uptake of poplars and willows from a heavily polluted soil. Plant Soil, 277 : 245–253.
  • Smith, S.E. and Read, D.J. (1997). Mycorrhizal Symbiosis. 2nd ed. Academic, London 605 pp.
  • Tam, P.C.F. and Griffiths, D.A. (1993).Mycorrhizal associations in Hong Kong Fagaceae III. The mobilization of organic and poorly soluble phosphates by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius. Mycorrhiza, 2: 133–139.
  • Trappe, J.M. (1982).Synoptic keys to the genera and species of zygomycetous mycorrhizal fungi. Phytopath., 13: 1102-1108.
  • Trowbridge, J. and Jumpponen, A. (2004).Fungal colonization of shrub willow roots at the forefront of a receding glacier. Mycorrhiza, 14: 283-293.

Abstract Views: 30

PDF Views: 0




  • Status of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) in Nurseries of Willow, Poplar and Pine Seedlings in Himachal Pradesh

Abstract Views: 30  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Sunita Chandel
Department of Plant Pathology, Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (H.P.), India
Vijay Kumar
Department of Plant Pathology, Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Nauni, Solan (H.P.), India

Abstract


Poplar and willow are economically-important, fast-growing tree species with the ability to colonize nutrient-poor environments. Willow (Salix sp.) offers a great potential as a source of renewable energy and for bioremediation and polluted environments. To initiate a study on the possible contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to this ability, we isolated mycorrhial fungi from in and around the rhizosphere of native poplar (Populus sp.), willow (Salix sp.) and pine (Pinus sp.) seedlings grown in research nurseries at Dr. Y.S. Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Solan (H.P.). Several species of mycorrhizal fungi grew well in the rhizosphere of these trees, were characterized based on morphological studies. The number of spores per 50 g of rhizosphere soil from pinus, willow and poplar were found to be 1380, 1290, 1300 and 540, 490, 530 spores at 106 µ and 250 µ mesh sieves, respectively. The presence of these AM fungi may help explain the ability of these pioneering tree species to grow under nitrogen limitation. Their presence will be helpful in mitigating the losses due to soil borne diseases as well as enhancing the plant vigor.

Keywords


VAM (Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhiza), Poplar, Willow, Pine, Salix, Rhizosphere.

References