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Burden of Anaemia among School Going Rural Adolescent Girls in District Kurukshetra


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1 Department of Home Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra - 136119, India
2 Department of Home Science, Indira Gandhi National College, Ladwa – 136132, India
     

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Nutritional anaemia is widely prevalent in many parts of the world, particularly in developing countries. Adolescence, a period of rapid growth and development, is considered the most nutritionally vulnerable group. In studies conducted in developing countries, adolescent anaemia was reported as the greatest nutritional problem. The prevalence of anaemia in the developing countries tends to be three to four times higher than in the developed countries. Anaemia is an indicator of both poor health and poor nutrition. A review of Indian studies on anaemia in adolescent girls revealed that > 70 per cent of adolescent girls in low income communities had hemoglobin levels < 110 g/L. When World Health Organization (WHO) cut off of 120 g/L was applied, the prevalence was even higher (80-90%).
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  • Burden of Anaemia among School Going Rural Adolescent Girls in District Kurukshetra

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Authors

Tarvinderjeet Kaur
Department of Home Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra - 136119, India
Sonali Goel
Department of Home Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra - 136119, India
Madhu Gupta
Department of Home Science, Indira Gandhi National College, Ladwa – 136132, India

Abstract


Nutritional anaemia is widely prevalent in many parts of the world, particularly in developing countries. Adolescence, a period of rapid growth and development, is considered the most nutritionally vulnerable group. In studies conducted in developing countries, adolescent anaemia was reported as the greatest nutritional problem. The prevalence of anaemia in the developing countries tends to be three to four times higher than in the developed countries. Anaemia is an indicator of both poor health and poor nutrition. A review of Indian studies on anaemia in adolescent girls revealed that > 70 per cent of adolescent girls in low income communities had hemoglobin levels < 110 g/L. When World Health Organization (WHO) cut off of 120 g/L was applied, the prevalence was even higher (80-90%).

References