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Serum Calcium and Magnesium Levels in Post Menopausal Women


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1 Department of Physiology, C.U. Shah Medical College, Surendranagar, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Physiology, Government Medical College, Baroda, India
     

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Menopause is the consequence of the exhaustion of the ovarian follicles, which results in a decreased production of estradiol and other hormones 1 . The decrease in the levels of the sex steroid hormones during menopause in women causes a number of disturbances in the metabolism of different organs. In this period of life, the risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, arterial hypertension and impairment of glucose metabolism, breast cancer and degenerative cognition diseases rises. The impact of estrogen deficiency after menopause on the trace minerals has not yet been widely studied but the expected menopause related alterations in the trace mineral status may have an impact on the above pathologies. The risk of nutritional disturbances, particularly of calcium, magnesium and vitamin deficiency is high during menopause 2 . Magnesium enhances bone turnover through the stimulation of the osteoclastic function and its deficiency may play a role in postmenopausal osteoporosis. It acts as a surrogate for calcium in the transport and mineralization process 3 . Its deficiency may lead to disturbances in the cardiac rhythm, necrotic changes, atheromatous plaques, a high value of total cholesterol and a low value of high density lipoprotein cholesterol 4.
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  • Serum Calcium and Magnesium Levels in Post Menopausal Women

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Authors

Sushil Kumar
Department of Physiology, C.U. Shah Medical College, Surendranagar, Gujarat, India
Prema Ram Choudhary
Department of Physiology, C.U. Shah Medical College, Surendranagar, Gujarat, India
Elvy R. Oommen
Department of Physiology, Government Medical College, Baroda, India
Chinmay Shah
Department of Physiology, Government Medical College, Baroda, India

Abstract


Menopause is the consequence of the exhaustion of the ovarian follicles, which results in a decreased production of estradiol and other hormones 1 . The decrease in the levels of the sex steroid hormones during menopause in women causes a number of disturbances in the metabolism of different organs. In this period of life, the risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, arterial hypertension and impairment of glucose metabolism, breast cancer and degenerative cognition diseases rises. The impact of estrogen deficiency after menopause on the trace minerals has not yet been widely studied but the expected menopause related alterations in the trace mineral status may have an impact on the above pathologies. The risk of nutritional disturbances, particularly of calcium, magnesium and vitamin deficiency is high during menopause 2 . Magnesium enhances bone turnover through the stimulation of the osteoclastic function and its deficiency may play a role in postmenopausal osteoporosis. It acts as a surrogate for calcium in the transport and mineralization process 3 . Its deficiency may lead to disturbances in the cardiac rhythm, necrotic changes, atheromatous plaques, a high value of total cholesterol and a low value of high density lipoprotein cholesterol 4.

References