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Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Power Loom Women Workers of Sulur Taluk in Coimbatore District


Affiliations
1 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore, India
2 Orthopaedic Consultant and Surgeon, Global Ortho and Trauma Centre, Coimbatore, India
     

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The skeleton provides physical support and protection for internal organs and through the actions of muscles it enables movements. It also acts as a reservoir for minerals particularly calcium. The adult skeleton contains 1 to1.5 kg calcium (20-25mg/kg fat free tissue) and represents 99 per cent of the total body calcium. Less than one per cent of calcium circulates in a soluble form, and it is this fraction that plays a vital role in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, blood coagulation and as an intracellular second messenger for cell surface hormone action. In addition calcium plays a role in gene transcription and cellular growth and metabolism. Calcium is required by adults for replacing calcium lost from the body through urine, stools, bile and sweat. It is estimated that in adult this loss may be 700mg/day. However the body can reduce this loss on a low calcium intake through a process of adaptation involving reduced excretion.
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  • Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Power Loom Women Workers of Sulur Taluk in Coimbatore District

Abstract Views: 106  |  PDF Views: 4

Authors

Jemima B. Mohankumar
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore, India
G. Ramya
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore, India
S. Karthik
Orthopaedic Consultant and Surgeon, Global Ortho and Trauma Centre, Coimbatore, India

Abstract


The skeleton provides physical support and protection for internal organs and through the actions of muscles it enables movements. It also acts as a reservoir for minerals particularly calcium. The adult skeleton contains 1 to1.5 kg calcium (20-25mg/kg fat free tissue) and represents 99 per cent of the total body calcium. Less than one per cent of calcium circulates in a soluble form, and it is this fraction that plays a vital role in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, blood coagulation and as an intracellular second messenger for cell surface hormone action. In addition calcium plays a role in gene transcription and cellular growth and metabolism. Calcium is required by adults for replacing calcium lost from the body through urine, stools, bile and sweat. It is estimated that in adult this loss may be 700mg/day. However the body can reduce this loss on a low calcium intake through a process of adaptation involving reduced excretion.

References