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Assessment of Knowledge and Awareness of the Glycemic Index Concept in Singapore


Affiliations
1 Glycemic Index Research Unit, Temasek Polytechnic, 529757, Singapore
2 Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore-641 043, India
     

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The glycemic concept and the Glycemic Index (GI) are being used globally as a mark of product differentiation. The Australian market has been exposed to the GI concept for the longest time. The GI concept in Australia has gained impetus due to the continuous and concerted efforts of the GI Symbol Program that is backed by the University of Sydney, Diabetes Australia and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. The program provides a trusted signpost that the products have been tested properly for their GI. The consumers and health professionals are well informed about the concept and there are a wide range of low GI products with the GI symbol in supermarkets in Australia.
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Notifications

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  • Assessment of Knowledge and Awareness of the Glycemic Index Concept in Singapore

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Authors

B. Kalpana
Glycemic Index Research Unit, Temasek Polytechnic, 529757, Singapore
Siti Hussain
Glycemic Index Research Unit, Temasek Polytechnic, 529757, Singapore
S. Uma Mageshwari
Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women, Coimbatore-641 043, India

Abstract


The glycemic concept and the Glycemic Index (GI) are being used globally as a mark of product differentiation. The Australian market has been exposed to the GI concept for the longest time. The GI concept in Australia has gained impetus due to the continuous and concerted efforts of the GI Symbol Program that is backed by the University of Sydney, Diabetes Australia and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. The program provides a trusted signpost that the products have been tested properly for their GI. The consumers and health professionals are well informed about the concept and there are a wide range of low GI products with the GI symbol in supermarkets in Australia.

References