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Promising Nutritional and Curative Potentials of Cauliflower Leaves


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1 Department of Home Science, University of Calcutta, 20B, Judges Court Road, Kolkata 700027, India
     

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Among the poor people, dietary inadequacy of most nutrients is very common. The inclusion of the small amount of dried greens in the daily diet improves its nutritive value. An extended review of the literature revealed that cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) is widely consumed in India, but its nutritious leaves are usually thrown away by the people due to the ignorance. These low-cost, easily available, seasonal greens are rich in protein and micronutrients which can be utilized as a “natural fortificant” to enrich the common recipes. Nowadays dry cauliflower leaf powder (CLP) is used to prepare many value-added products, like wheat noodles, biscuits, cookies, chocolates, various types of snacks, chapatti, pancake, functional beverage, etc., which are well-accepted. Human studies showed that regular intake of CLP-enriched recipes improved the nutritional status of the participants and helps to prevent and treat protein-energy malnutrition, anaemia, vitamin-A deficiency disorders. The nutritional and curative potentials of less utilized cauliflower leaf should be properly utilized to prepare low-cost, nutrientdense supplementary foods which will be helpful in improving the nutritional status of common people, reducing the vegetable waste generation and widen the food basket.

Keywords

Cauliflower Greens, Cauliflower Leaf Powder (CLP), Anaemia, Vitamin-A Deficiency Disorders, Value-Added Products.
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  • Promising Nutritional and Curative Potentials of Cauliflower Leaves

Abstract Views: 297  |  PDF Views: 3

Authors

Sagarika Chakraborty
Department of Home Science, University of Calcutta, 20B, Judges Court Road, Kolkata 700027, India
Santa Datta
Department of Home Science, University of Calcutta, 20B, Judges Court Road, Kolkata 700027, India

Abstract


Among the poor people, dietary inadequacy of most nutrients is very common. The inclusion of the small amount of dried greens in the daily diet improves its nutritive value. An extended review of the literature revealed that cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) is widely consumed in India, but its nutritious leaves are usually thrown away by the people due to the ignorance. These low-cost, easily available, seasonal greens are rich in protein and micronutrients which can be utilized as a “natural fortificant” to enrich the common recipes. Nowadays dry cauliflower leaf powder (CLP) is used to prepare many value-added products, like wheat noodles, biscuits, cookies, chocolates, various types of snacks, chapatti, pancake, functional beverage, etc., which are well-accepted. Human studies showed that regular intake of CLP-enriched recipes improved the nutritional status of the participants and helps to prevent and treat protein-energy malnutrition, anaemia, vitamin-A deficiency disorders. The nutritional and curative potentials of less utilized cauliflower leaf should be properly utilized to prepare low-cost, nutrientdense supplementary foods which will be helpful in improving the nutritional status of common people, reducing the vegetable waste generation and widen the food basket.

Keywords


Cauliflower Greens, Cauliflower Leaf Powder (CLP), Anaemia, Vitamin-A Deficiency Disorders, Value-Added Products.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.24906/isc%2F2018%2Fv32%2Fi4%2F176487