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A Study of Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 for the Management of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea in Adults


Affiliations
1 Synergia Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., India
2 Kokan Hospital, India
     

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Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 in an open-labelled placebo-controlled trial in a group of 60 patients with Antibiotic Associated Diarrhoea (AAD).

Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 60 patients suffering from AAD. Patients received either Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 (2 × 109 CFU/Cap) or placebo for 7 days and followed up to 15th day. Stool consistency was recorded during the baseline, 3rd day, 7th day and 15th day and analyzed according to the Bristol stool chart. The trial was approved by an Independent Ethics Committee and registered with CTRI. Before enrolment, an informed written consent was obtained from the patients.

Results: Stool consistency as assessed according to the Bristol stool chart had decreased in the probiotic treated group (p < 0.0001) as compared to the placebo group (p = 0.8003). At baseline the stool consistency measurements according to the Bristol stool chart in both groups (probiotic group and placebo group) were found to be 7. The stool frequency had reduced from 7-8 stools per day to 1-2 stools per day. Significant improvement was observed in 16 patients (scale 4), mild improvement observed in 6 patients (scale 5) and no improvement was observed in 8 patients (scale 6) as observed till the 15th day. There was no reduction of score in the placebo group (scale 7) till the 15th day. Also the stool frequency in this group had just reduced from 7-8 stools to 3-4 stools per day.

Conclusions: This study had shown that Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 at a dose of 2 × 109 CFU/Cap once a day for 7 days was well tolerated and safe and compared to placebo the probiotic group significantly showed a reduced incidence of AAD.


Keywords

Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58, Antibiotic Associated Diarrhoea (AAD), Colony Forming Units (CFU), Bristol Stool Chart, Stool Consistency.
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  • A Study of Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 for the Management of Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea in Adults

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Authors

D. S. Mehta
Synergia Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., India
A. de Souza
Synergia Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., India
S. S. Jadhav
Synergia Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., India
M. Devale
Kokan Hospital, India

Abstract


Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 in an open-labelled placebo-controlled trial in a group of 60 patients with Antibiotic Associated Diarrhoea (AAD).

Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 60 patients suffering from AAD. Patients received either Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 (2 × 109 CFU/Cap) or placebo for 7 days and followed up to 15th day. Stool consistency was recorded during the baseline, 3rd day, 7th day and 15th day and analyzed according to the Bristol stool chart. The trial was approved by an Independent Ethics Committee and registered with CTRI. Before enrolment, an informed written consent was obtained from the patients.

Results: Stool consistency as assessed according to the Bristol stool chart had decreased in the probiotic treated group (p < 0.0001) as compared to the placebo group (p = 0.8003). At baseline the stool consistency measurements according to the Bristol stool chart in both groups (probiotic group and placebo group) were found to be 7. The stool frequency had reduced from 7-8 stools per day to 1-2 stools per day. Significant improvement was observed in 16 patients (scale 4), mild improvement observed in 6 patients (scale 5) and no improvement was observed in 8 patients (scale 6) as observed till the 15th day. There was no reduction of score in the placebo group (scale 7) till the 15th day. Also the stool frequency in this group had just reduced from 7-8 stools to 3-4 stools per day.

Conclusions: This study had shown that Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58 at a dose of 2 × 109 CFU/Cap once a day for 7 days was well tolerated and safe and compared to placebo the probiotic group significantly showed a reduced incidence of AAD.


Keywords


Probiotic Bacillus subtilis HU58, Antibiotic Associated Diarrhoea (AAD), Colony Forming Units (CFU), Bristol Stool Chart, Stool Consistency.

References