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A Review of Digestive Enzyme and Probiotic Supplementation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders


Affiliations
1 Yatharth Super Speciality Hospital, Greater Noida, India
2 Senior Consultant, Internal Medicine, Bhopal, India
3 Sunflower Medical Centre, Lucknow, India
4 Paras Hospitals, Gurugram, India
5 Medical Affairs, Macleods Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Mumbai, India
6 Centre for Clinical Research and Practice & Research Centre for Diabetes, Hypertension and Obesity, Samastipur, India
     

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Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) also known as disorders of gut-brain interaction are chronic, recurrent disorders with no identifiable underlying pathology. The FGID with upper abdominal pain and discomfort is the hallmark feature of functional dyspepsia. Around 11-30 % prevalence of functional dyspepsia is reported worldwide. One of the unique features of functional dyspepsia is transient deficiency of digestive enzymes in the system. Digestive enzymes are produced and secreted by the gastrointestinal system to break down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates, to accomplish digestion and, afterwards, the absorption of nutrients. Supplementation with digestive enzymes could provide management of disorders caused by impaired digestive function. Various formulations of enzyme supplementation are available commercially in the market, and are currently used in clinical practice for the management of several digestive diseases. Probiotics have multi-faceted role, helping to restore the gut microbiota.

This review elaborates the potential of multi digestive enzymes along with probiotics in the management of digestive diseases and dyspepsia.


Keywords

Digestive enzyme, Probiotics, Functional Dyspepsia, Indigestion.
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  • A Review of Digestive Enzyme and Probiotic Supplementation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

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Authors

N. K. Soni
Yatharth Super Speciality Hospital, Greater Noida, India
H. H. Trivedi
Senior Consultant, Internal Medicine, Bhopal, India
Sanjay Kumar
Sunflower Medical Centre, Lucknow, India
Anukalp Prakash
Paras Hospitals, Gurugram, India
Soumen Roy
Medical Affairs, Macleods Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Mumbai, India
Amit Qamra
Medical Affairs, Macleods Pharmaceuticals Ltd., Mumbai, India
Supriyo Mukherjee
Centre for Clinical Research and Practice & Research Centre for Diabetes, Hypertension and Obesity, Samastipur, India

Abstract


Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) also known as disorders of gut-brain interaction are chronic, recurrent disorders with no identifiable underlying pathology. The FGID with upper abdominal pain and discomfort is the hallmark feature of functional dyspepsia. Around 11-30 % prevalence of functional dyspepsia is reported worldwide. One of the unique features of functional dyspepsia is transient deficiency of digestive enzymes in the system. Digestive enzymes are produced and secreted by the gastrointestinal system to break down fats, proteins, and carbohydrates, to accomplish digestion and, afterwards, the absorption of nutrients. Supplementation with digestive enzymes could provide management of disorders caused by impaired digestive function. Various formulations of enzyme supplementation are available commercially in the market, and are currently used in clinical practice for the management of several digestive diseases. Probiotics have multi-faceted role, helping to restore the gut microbiota.

This review elaborates the potential of multi digestive enzymes along with probiotics in the management of digestive diseases and dyspepsia.


Keywords


Digestive enzyme, Probiotics, Functional Dyspepsia, Indigestion.

References