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Luliconazole: Paradigm Shift in the Management of Topical Tinea Infections


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1 Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
     

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Luliconazole is an imidazole topical antifungal agent with a unique structure. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated excellent activity against dermatophytes. Although luliconazole belongs to the azole group, it has strong antifungal activities against Trichophyton spp. This may be attributed to a combination of strong in vitro antifungal activity and favourable pharmaco kinetic properties in the skin. Clinical trials have demonstrated its superiority over placebo in dermatophytosis, and performed better than terbinafine. The frequency of application (once daily) and duration of treatment (one week for tinea corporis/cruris and 2 weeks for interdigital tinea pedis) was favourable when compared to other topical regimens in treating tinea pedis. Such regimens include 2–4 weeks of twice-daily treatment with econazole, up to 4 weeks of twice-daily treatment with sertaconazole, 1–2 weeks of twice-daily treatment with terbinafine, 4 weeks of once-daily application of naftifine and 4–6 weeks of once-daily treatment with amorolfine. Luliconazole 1% cream was approved in Japan in 2005 for the treatment of tinea infections. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) approved luliconazole for interdigital tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis treatment. Topical luliconazole has a favourable safety profile, with mild application-site reactions reported occasionally.

Keywords

Luliconazole, Tinea pedis, Tinea corporis, Tinea cruris, once a daily
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  • Luliconazole: Paradigm Shift in the Management of Topical Tinea Infections

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Authors

Hardik Pathak
Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Abstract


Luliconazole is an imidazole topical antifungal agent with a unique structure. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated excellent activity against dermatophytes. Although luliconazole belongs to the azole group, it has strong antifungal activities against Trichophyton spp. This may be attributed to a combination of strong in vitro antifungal activity and favourable pharmaco kinetic properties in the skin. Clinical trials have demonstrated its superiority over placebo in dermatophytosis, and performed better than terbinafine. The frequency of application (once daily) and duration of treatment (one week for tinea corporis/cruris and 2 weeks for interdigital tinea pedis) was favourable when compared to other topical regimens in treating tinea pedis. Such regimens include 2–4 weeks of twice-daily treatment with econazole, up to 4 weeks of twice-daily treatment with sertaconazole, 1–2 weeks of twice-daily treatment with terbinafine, 4 weeks of once-daily application of naftifine and 4–6 weeks of once-daily treatment with amorolfine. Luliconazole 1% cream was approved in Japan in 2005 for the treatment of tinea infections. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) approved luliconazole for interdigital tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis treatment. Topical luliconazole has a favourable safety profile, with mild application-site reactions reported occasionally.

Keywords


Luliconazole, Tinea pedis, Tinea corporis, Tinea cruris, once a daily

References