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The Skill of Adaptation, Handling Stress and Social Support in Moving Millennials to Universities in India


Affiliations
1 University of Hyderabad, Telangana, India
2 NRSC, ISRO, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
 

The proposed research is designed to address two major deficits in knowledge regarding the adaptation of students moving from their native place to the Indian university environment, including a lack of information about the impact of shifting on students at different age and course levels and the absence of longitudinal data regarding post-shifting adjustment. The focus of the study is on the emotional, behavioral, and academic adaptation of students, in relation to their level of post-shifting stress and the support provided by their social networks. Participants were 100 newly first year master students to last year doctoral students. Participating students from the first year master students were interviewed shortly after entry, with a second assessment 3 months later, and so were the case for others. Higher levels of stress and lower levels of social support following migration was expected to be associated with poorer adaptation. The proposed research will provide a much-needed window on the initial adaptation of moving students of which information is severely lagging with the Universities.

Keywords

University, Adaptation, Stress, Emotion, Behaviour.
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  • The Skill of Adaptation, Handling Stress and Social Support in Moving Millennials to Universities in India

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Authors

Ritika Singh
University of Hyderabad, Telangana, India
Shashanka Kumar Mishra
NRSC, ISRO, Hyderabad, Telangana, India

Abstract


The proposed research is designed to address two major deficits in knowledge regarding the adaptation of students moving from their native place to the Indian university environment, including a lack of information about the impact of shifting on students at different age and course levels and the absence of longitudinal data regarding post-shifting adjustment. The focus of the study is on the emotional, behavioral, and academic adaptation of students, in relation to their level of post-shifting stress and the support provided by their social networks. Participants were 100 newly first year master students to last year doctoral students. Participating students from the first year master students were interviewed shortly after entry, with a second assessment 3 months later, and so were the case for others. Higher levels of stress and lower levels of social support following migration was expected to be associated with poorer adaptation. The proposed research will provide a much-needed window on the initial adaptation of moving students of which information is severely lagging with the Universities.

Keywords


University, Adaptation, Stress, Emotion, Behaviour.

References