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Determining the Impact of Migration on Women


Affiliations
1 Research Scholar, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore
 

The outcomes of migration have traditionally been described in terms of economic mobility. While measuring the impact of migration in terms of improved financial positioning is important, migration does not necessarily improve the economic and social status of the migrant, particularly, migrant women. This paper highlights how the impact of migration on migrant women is defined in complex terms, encompassing domestic patriarchy, social mobility, conventional femininity and sustained economic stability. The paper also focuses on the contradictory elements which determine the migratory experience of women and how their future plans are influenced by a multitude of factors, not limited by their past experiences and the socio-political climate.

Keywords

Migration, International Migration, Women, India, United Arab Emirates.
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  • Determining the Impact of Migration on Women

Abstract Views: 39  |  PDF Views: 10

Authors

Shruti Gupta
Research Scholar, National University of Singapore, 21 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore

Abstract


The outcomes of migration have traditionally been described in terms of economic mobility. While measuring the impact of migration in terms of improved financial positioning is important, migration does not necessarily improve the economic and social status of the migrant, particularly, migrant women. This paper highlights how the impact of migration on migrant women is defined in complex terms, encompassing domestic patriarchy, social mobility, conventional femininity and sustained economic stability. The paper also focuses on the contradictory elements which determine the migratory experience of women and how their future plans are influenced by a multitude of factors, not limited by their past experiences and the socio-political climate.

Keywords


Migration, International Migration, Women, India, United Arab Emirates.

References