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Living with Loss and Hope:Reflections from a Research with Widows in Kashmir


     

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In the context of intractable conflicts, women face the consequences of deaths and disappearances of their husbands at various levels. However, this may not be known or understood by each of those who share opinions about national safety and security. In the process of forming and propagating our judgments about political conflicts, it is important to reflect upon the extent of one’s knowledge about lives of people from conflict zones. This paper, through some of the narratives of women from Kashmir, urges readers to know more about the context of conflict instead of believing in assumptions that may have been promoted through popular media. This paper is based on my research that focused on resilience among women widowed due to conflict in Kashmir.

Keywords

Kashmir Conflilct, Widows, National Security, Human Security, Intractable Conflict.
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  • Living with Loss and Hope:Reflections from a Research with Widows in Kashmir

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Abstract


In the context of intractable conflicts, women face the consequences of deaths and disappearances of their husbands at various levels. However, this may not be known or understood by each of those who share opinions about national safety and security. In the process of forming and propagating our judgments about political conflicts, it is important to reflect upon the extent of one’s knowledge about lives of people from conflict zones. This paper, through some of the narratives of women from Kashmir, urges readers to know more about the context of conflict instead of believing in assumptions that may have been promoted through popular media. This paper is based on my research that focused on resilience among women widowed due to conflict in Kashmir.

Keywords


Kashmir Conflilct, Widows, National Security, Human Security, Intractable Conflict.

References