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Microorganisms Associated with Composting of Pycnanthus angolensis with Cow Dung


Affiliations
1 Integrated Science Department, Adeyemi College of Education, Ondo, Nigeria
2 Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
 

Composting and vermicomposting processes were carried out using wood dust of Pycnanthus angolensis with animal waste added as boosters for compost. Substrates were prepared with varying ratio of wood dust: animal waste and kept for a period of 10 weeks on shelf outdoor. The temperature reached a maximum of 42.50C in composting in 2 weeks of the process and dropped to 25.50C in vermicomposting at the same period. At the initial stage, more of gram positive bacteria were isolated, including Bacillus coagulans, Pediococcus cerevisae, Streptococcus faecalis. Lactobacillus subger, Micrococcus luteus, Actinomyces bovis, Actinomyces ericksonii. Some of the gram negative bacteria isolated were Acinetobacter anitratis, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Brucella militenses.  The fungi species isolated include Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sp Curvularia The highest total population of bacteria was 2.55×107 cfu/ml, while that of fungi was 4.35 105 sfu/ml  isolated from compost substrate of the wood dust and cow dung. The total bacteria population increased from 4.55 ×106 to 2.55×107cfu/ml in composting, and 6.82×106cfu/ml in vermicomposting in 2 weeks. Both bacteria and fungi diversity and population reduced significantly at the end of the process with the most occurring genus as Bacillus and Aspergillus species.


Keywords

Animal Waste, Bacteria, Decomposition, Isolation, Substrate.
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  • Microorganisms Associated with Composting of Pycnanthus angolensis with Cow Dung

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Authors

O. O. Olabode
Integrated Science Department, Adeyemi College of Education, Ondo, Nigeria
D. V. Adegunloye
Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
B. J. Akinyele
Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
F. A. Akinyosoye
Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria

Abstract


Composting and vermicomposting processes were carried out using wood dust of Pycnanthus angolensis with animal waste added as boosters for compost. Substrates were prepared with varying ratio of wood dust: animal waste and kept for a period of 10 weeks on shelf outdoor. The temperature reached a maximum of 42.50C in composting in 2 weeks of the process and dropped to 25.50C in vermicomposting at the same period. At the initial stage, more of gram positive bacteria were isolated, including Bacillus coagulans, Pediococcus cerevisae, Streptococcus faecalis. Lactobacillus subger, Micrococcus luteus, Actinomyces bovis, Actinomyces ericksonii. Some of the gram negative bacteria isolated were Acinetobacter anitratis, Citrobacter freundii, Escherichia coli Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Brucella militenses.  The fungi species isolated include Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sp Curvularia The highest total population of bacteria was 2.55×107 cfu/ml, while that of fungi was 4.35 105 sfu/ml  isolated from compost substrate of the wood dust and cow dung. The total bacteria population increased from 4.55 ×106 to 2.55×107cfu/ml in composting, and 6.82×106cfu/ml in vermicomposting in 2 weeks. Both bacteria and fungi diversity and population reduced significantly at the end of the process with the most occurring genus as Bacillus and Aspergillus species.


Keywords


Animal Waste, Bacteria, Decomposition, Isolation, Substrate.