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Relationship between Resource Distribution along Ilemi Borders and Solutions to the Conflicts


Affiliations
1 Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega, Kenya
 

Disputed territorial borders account for most violent conflicts involving states in the world. Management of the said conflicts has been dogged by lack of political commitment from African state leaders and the ignorance of the peripheral ethnic groups found along the borders. The study sought to evaluate the extent to which resource distribution along the borders has contributed to the escalation of pastoral conflict in the Illemi triangle. The study adopted neo-realism and conflict theories, while employing correlational research design. The target population included all the households in Kibish sub-county (Kenya), Narus and Mogos in South Sudan. A stratified random sample of 432 household heads and 30 key informants was selected from the three administrative units. Data collection tools used included household survey interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs) and in depth interviews. The collected data was analyzed quantitatively. The study established that there was a significant relationship between left out priority issues that caused conflict in Illemi triangle and possibilities of permanently ending the conflict. The study concludes that the boundary dispute in the Illemi triangle can only be ended if the priority areas are addressed. The results of this study are significant towards formulation of policy guidelines towards realizing lasting peace in the Illemi Triangle.


Keywords

Illemi Triangle, Border Dispute, Pastoral Conflicts, Resource Distribution, Lasting Peace.
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  • Relationship between Resource Distribution along Ilemi Borders and Solutions to the Conflicts

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Authors

Joseph Melle
Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega, Kenya
Pontian Okoth
Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega, Kenya
Edmund Were
Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega, Kenya
Silvia Vundi
Masinde Muliro University, Kakamega, Kenya

Abstract


Disputed territorial borders account for most violent conflicts involving states in the world. Management of the said conflicts has been dogged by lack of political commitment from African state leaders and the ignorance of the peripheral ethnic groups found along the borders. The study sought to evaluate the extent to which resource distribution along the borders has contributed to the escalation of pastoral conflict in the Illemi triangle. The study adopted neo-realism and conflict theories, while employing correlational research design. The target population included all the households in Kibish sub-county (Kenya), Narus and Mogos in South Sudan. A stratified random sample of 432 household heads and 30 key informants was selected from the three administrative units. Data collection tools used included household survey interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs) and in depth interviews. The collected data was analyzed quantitatively. The study established that there was a significant relationship between left out priority issues that caused conflict in Illemi triangle and possibilities of permanently ending the conflict. The study concludes that the boundary dispute in the Illemi triangle can only be ended if the priority areas are addressed. The results of this study are significant towards formulation of policy guidelines towards realizing lasting peace in the Illemi Triangle.


Keywords


Illemi Triangle, Border Dispute, Pastoral Conflicts, Resource Distribution, Lasting Peace.