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Prevalence Study of Bovine Strongylosis in Tullo Woreda, Western Hararghe Zone, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia


Affiliations
1 West Hararghe Zone Livestock and Fisheries Recourse Development Office, Chiro, Ethiopia
2 Department of Animal Science, Oda Bultum University, Chiro, Ethiopia
 

A study was carried out from November 2015 to April 2016 to determine the prevalence of bovine strongylosis in Tullo woreda, western Hararghe administrative zone based on faecal examination. A total of 384 faecal samples were collected from cattle at different sites of the woreda. Out of 384 the examined animals, 157(40.89%) were positive for strongyle. Prevalence on the basis of localities indicates that a higher in Kira kufis (62.82%) followed by Lubu dekeb (43.04%), Ifa bas (38.75%), Reketa fura (31.43%), Oda balina (27.27%) respectively. Statistical analysis of the result on the basis of sex, age and body conditions were not statistically significant different (P > 0.05), but there was statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the prevalence of different study sites. In the study 157 positive cases were examined using the McMaster counting method to determine intensity of the infections. The result showed 21(13.36+%) cattle were severely infected, 51(32.48%) moderately and 85(54.24%) were mildly infected. The mean of EPG of positive animals was 593. The analyzed   data indicates a negative correlation between EPG and age of the animal. Most of the animals examined during the present study had low to moderate strongyle eggs counts, suggesting that the infections were sub-clinical. Some recommendations were forwarded for controlling of this parasite in the study area.


Keywords

Bovine, Strongylosis, Prevalence, Tullo.
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  • Prevalence Study of Bovine Strongylosis in Tullo Woreda, Western Hararghe Zone, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia

Abstract Views: 195  |  PDF Views: 6

Authors

Mohammed Ahmed Tahir
West Hararghe Zone Livestock and Fisheries Recourse Development Office, Chiro, Ethiopia
Ahmedin Abdurehman
Department of Animal Science, Oda Bultum University, Chiro, Ethiopia
Fuad Mohammed
West Hararghe Zone Livestock and Fisheries Recourse Development Office, Chiro, Ethiopia

Abstract


A study was carried out from November 2015 to April 2016 to determine the prevalence of bovine strongylosis in Tullo woreda, western Hararghe administrative zone based on faecal examination. A total of 384 faecal samples were collected from cattle at different sites of the woreda. Out of 384 the examined animals, 157(40.89%) were positive for strongyle. Prevalence on the basis of localities indicates that a higher in Kira kufis (62.82%) followed by Lubu dekeb (43.04%), Ifa bas (38.75%), Reketa fura (31.43%), Oda balina (27.27%) respectively. Statistical analysis of the result on the basis of sex, age and body conditions were not statistically significant different (P > 0.05), but there was statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in the prevalence of different study sites. In the study 157 positive cases were examined using the McMaster counting method to determine intensity of the infections. The result showed 21(13.36+%) cattle were severely infected, 51(32.48%) moderately and 85(54.24%) were mildly infected. The mean of EPG of positive animals was 593. The analyzed   data indicates a negative correlation between EPG and age of the animal. Most of the animals examined during the present study had low to moderate strongyle eggs counts, suggesting that the infections were sub-clinical. Some recommendations were forwarded for controlling of this parasite in the study area.


Keywords


Bovine, Strongylosis, Prevalence, Tullo.

References