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To Be Screened or Scream Away:Perceptions of Women towards Cervical Cancer Screening in Gwanda Central District at Bhalula Village in Matabeleland South Province-Zimbabwe


Affiliations
1 Department of Psychology, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe
 

The study is the exploration of the perceptions of women at Bhalula Village, towards cervical cancer screening. The research was a qualitative exploration research design which made use of in-depth semi-structure interviews as data collection instrument. The target population was women at Bhalula Village. The population sample consisted of 20 women who were chosen through convenience sampling. The findings of the research depicts that women are not aware of cervical cancer as well as cervical cancer screening. Women in the study were not are aware of factors responsible for causing cancer in general and cervical cancer in particular. Determinants of women’s perceptions towards cervical cancer screening are usually encompassed in the lack of knowledge on the disease as most women are unaware of the risk factors of cervical cancer. Reasons such as fear, pain, cost and shyness showed that women were not very much aware of cervical cancer. The research concludes that there is inadequate information on cervical cancer as well as a low screening rate among women at Bhalula village. The study recommends that the responsible authorities should play a pivotal role in increasing health care facilities and be able to prioritize cervical cancer prevention by establishing national awareness campaigns, offering free screening services and qualified health practitioners throughout the country.  


Keywords

Cervical Cancer, Cervical Cancer Screening, Perceptions, Determinants.
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  • To Be Screened or Scream Away:Perceptions of Women towards Cervical Cancer Screening in Gwanda Central District at Bhalula Village in Matabeleland South Province-Zimbabwe

Abstract Views: 152  |  PDF Views: 5

Authors

Sibangilizwe Maphosa
Department of Psychology, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe

Abstract


The study is the exploration of the perceptions of women at Bhalula Village, towards cervical cancer screening. The research was a qualitative exploration research design which made use of in-depth semi-structure interviews as data collection instrument. The target population was women at Bhalula Village. The population sample consisted of 20 women who were chosen through convenience sampling. The findings of the research depicts that women are not aware of cervical cancer as well as cervical cancer screening. Women in the study were not are aware of factors responsible for causing cancer in general and cervical cancer in particular. Determinants of women’s perceptions towards cervical cancer screening are usually encompassed in the lack of knowledge on the disease as most women are unaware of the risk factors of cervical cancer. Reasons such as fear, pain, cost and shyness showed that women were not very much aware of cervical cancer. The research concludes that there is inadequate information on cervical cancer as well as a low screening rate among women at Bhalula village. The study recommends that the responsible authorities should play a pivotal role in increasing health care facilities and be able to prioritize cervical cancer prevention by establishing national awareness campaigns, offering free screening services and qualified health practitioners throughout the country.  


Keywords


Cervical Cancer, Cervical Cancer Screening, Perceptions, Determinants.

References