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A Study of Effect of Storage Condition on Blood Alcohol Concentration in Living Subjects


Affiliations
1 Karwar Institute of Medical Sciences, Karwar, India
2 Mysore Medical College and Research Institute Mysore, India
 

Introduction: Many studies have demonstrated that both generation and loss of alcohol in stored blood samples. Studies have concluded that both high temperature and an insufficient enzyme inhibitor concentration can result in alcohol generation, presumably as a result of bacterial fermentation. Factors most affecting the stored blood samples, to be used for ethanol determination were the duration and temperature of storage and concentration of preservative. Objectives: To determine whether alcohol is generated or lost in blood samples stored at different periods and with the presence or absence of preservative and refrigeration. Methods: 40 adult males of drunkenness were selected as subjects for estimation of blood alcohol. Then after taking written informed consent 30ml of blood is collected from the each individuals. 5 samples were preserved in sodium fluoride vacutainer and refrigerated at 4°C. Another 5 samples were preserved in plain vacutainer and kept at room temperature. Then these were subjected to estimation of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) at various interval of time i.e., on 2nd, 7th, 14th, 30th and 60th day. Conclusion: BAC in samples without preservative and without refrigeration has fallen significantly as storage period increases at each point of time compared to BAC with preservative NaF (Sodium Fluoride) and with refrigeration at 4°C. NaF and refrigeration of samples at 4°C significantly prevents loss of BAC in stored samples.

Keywords

Blood Alcohol Concentration, Sodium Fluoride.
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  • A Study of Effect of Storage Condition on Blood Alcohol Concentration in Living Subjects

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Authors

D. G. Kishorkumar
Karwar Institute of Medical Sciences, Karwar, India
Anand P. Rayamane
Karwar Institute of Medical Sciences, Karwar, India
M. P. Kumar
Mysore Medical College and Research Institute Mysore, India

Abstract


Introduction: Many studies have demonstrated that both generation and loss of alcohol in stored blood samples. Studies have concluded that both high temperature and an insufficient enzyme inhibitor concentration can result in alcohol generation, presumably as a result of bacterial fermentation. Factors most affecting the stored blood samples, to be used for ethanol determination were the duration and temperature of storage and concentration of preservative. Objectives: To determine whether alcohol is generated or lost in blood samples stored at different periods and with the presence or absence of preservative and refrigeration. Methods: 40 adult males of drunkenness were selected as subjects for estimation of blood alcohol. Then after taking written informed consent 30ml of blood is collected from the each individuals. 5 samples were preserved in sodium fluoride vacutainer and refrigerated at 4°C. Another 5 samples were preserved in plain vacutainer and kept at room temperature. Then these were subjected to estimation of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) at various interval of time i.e., on 2nd, 7th, 14th, 30th and 60th day. Conclusion: BAC in samples without preservative and without refrigeration has fallen significantly as storage period increases at each point of time compared to BAC with preservative NaF (Sodium Fluoride) and with refrigeration at 4°C. NaF and refrigeration of samples at 4°C significantly prevents loss of BAC in stored samples.

Keywords


Blood Alcohol Concentration, Sodium Fluoride.

References