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Prevalence and Antibiogram of Uropathogens in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Manipur, India


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1 Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India
 

Introduction: Due to high variability of resistance patterns which vary even over short periods of time, periodic evaluation of such activity is essential. Aim: To document the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility and resistance patterns of uropathogens in the area to ensure appropriate therapy. Methods: This is a cross sectional study on 5108 urine samples from June 2014 to May 2015. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and compared. Gram positive cocci and Gram negative bacilli detected were further subjected to detection of Methicillin resistant Staphyloccocussureus (MRSA) by Cefoxitin disc diffusion tests and detection of Extended Spectrum Beta lactamases (ESBL) by ESBL screening test and confirmed by combined disc diffusion test(CDT). Results: Out of 5108 samples subjected to bacterial culture, 2940(57.56%) showed positive growth out of which Escherichia coli, 1300(44.2%) was the most common organism isolated followed by Staphylococcus aureus 914(31%), Klebsiella pneumonia 362(12.3%), Enterococcus 172(5.85%), Acinetobacter 80(2.72%), Pseudomonas 72(2.44%), Proteus 40(0.81%), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus 16(0.54%). On further evaluation, 1026(56.06%) isolates of Gram negative bacilli(GNB) family showed presence of ESBL and 722(78.99%) isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were positive for (MRSA) tests. Conclusion: Continual surveillance is required to detect changes in prevalence rates of different uropathogens. Increased prevalence of Acinetobacter was detected in our study. Monitoring of MRSA, ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is necessary to avoid treatment failure and development of further resistance in patients with UTI.

Keywords

Urinary Tract Infection, Acinetobacter.
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  • Prevalence and Antibiogram of Uropathogens in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Manipur, India

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Authors

Yumlembam Devi Bishwabati
Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India
Supriya Laifangbam
Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India
Manojkumar Singh Rajkumar
Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India
Smeeta Huidrom
Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India
Lokhendro Singh Huidrom
Department of Microbiology,Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences (JNIMS), Imphal East-05, India

Abstract


Introduction: Due to high variability of resistance patterns which vary even over short periods of time, periodic evaluation of such activity is essential. Aim: To document the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility and resistance patterns of uropathogens in the area to ensure appropriate therapy. Methods: This is a cross sectional study on 5108 urine samples from June 2014 to May 2015. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method and compared. Gram positive cocci and Gram negative bacilli detected were further subjected to detection of Methicillin resistant Staphyloccocussureus (MRSA) by Cefoxitin disc diffusion tests and detection of Extended Spectrum Beta lactamases (ESBL) by ESBL screening test and confirmed by combined disc diffusion test(CDT). Results: Out of 5108 samples subjected to bacterial culture, 2940(57.56%) showed positive growth out of which Escherichia coli, 1300(44.2%) was the most common organism isolated followed by Staphylococcus aureus 914(31%), Klebsiella pneumonia 362(12.3%), Enterococcus 172(5.85%), Acinetobacter 80(2.72%), Pseudomonas 72(2.44%), Proteus 40(0.81%), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus 16(0.54%). On further evaluation, 1026(56.06%) isolates of Gram negative bacilli(GNB) family showed presence of ESBL and 722(78.99%) isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were positive for (MRSA) tests. Conclusion: Continual surveillance is required to detect changes in prevalence rates of different uropathogens. Increased prevalence of Acinetobacter was detected in our study. Monitoring of MRSA, ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is necessary to avoid treatment failure and development of further resistance in patients with UTI.

Keywords


Urinary Tract Infection, Acinetobacter.

References