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Timing of Orthodontic Treatment


Affiliations
1 Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics Regional Dental College, Guwahati, Assam, India
 

Introduction: The ideal time to commence orthodontic treatment for any given patient has been a controversial issue since the establishment of orthodontia as a specialized science. Clinicians often faced with the dilemma of deciding at what age to refer for a further opinion and treatment. Objectives: Present review article looks into both the aspects of orthodontic treatment of various malocclusions which are seen in developing dentition. Evidence in the form of Meta Analysis, Randomized Control Trails has further high lightened that such an approach is not indicated in many cases for which later, one-phase treatment is more effective and efficient. Discussion: Understanding proper diagnostic criteria,customized treatment planning considering the patient goal and desire, with problem oriented approach is very important, but there is always a question that is there an “ideal” time for orthodontic treatment, if the clinician wants to maximize the benefits of growth and development without subjecting the child to fixed mechanotherapy for years. There is always certain degree of confusion regarding the early orthodontic treatment which reduces the functional problems and its psychological impact in the future. Conclusion: Therefore, it is prudent on the part of clinicians to judicially decide, on complexity of case, predictability of success and cost benefit basis when to provide orthodontic treatment. Therefore, clinician experience and clinical judgment to advise orthodontic treatment for such a case plays a very crucial role.

Keywords

Early, Late, Orthodontic, Malocclusion, Timing, Treatment.
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  • Timing of Orthodontic Treatment

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Authors

B. K. Roy
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics Regional Dental College, Guwahati, Assam, India
Ibemcha Chanu
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics Regional Dental College, Guwahati, Assam, India
Mahasweta Dasgupta
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics Regional Dental College, Guwahati, Assam, India

Abstract


Introduction: The ideal time to commence orthodontic treatment for any given patient has been a controversial issue since the establishment of orthodontia as a specialized science. Clinicians often faced with the dilemma of deciding at what age to refer for a further opinion and treatment. Objectives: Present review article looks into both the aspects of orthodontic treatment of various malocclusions which are seen in developing dentition. Evidence in the form of Meta Analysis, Randomized Control Trails has further high lightened that such an approach is not indicated in many cases for which later, one-phase treatment is more effective and efficient. Discussion: Understanding proper diagnostic criteria,customized treatment planning considering the patient goal and desire, with problem oriented approach is very important, but there is always a question that is there an “ideal” time for orthodontic treatment, if the clinician wants to maximize the benefits of growth and development without subjecting the child to fixed mechanotherapy for years. There is always certain degree of confusion regarding the early orthodontic treatment which reduces the functional problems and its psychological impact in the future. Conclusion: Therefore, it is prudent on the part of clinicians to judicially decide, on complexity of case, predictability of success and cost benefit basis when to provide orthodontic treatment. Therefore, clinician experience and clinical judgment to advise orthodontic treatment for such a case plays a very crucial role.

Keywords


Early, Late, Orthodontic, Malocclusion, Timing, Treatment.

References