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Hip Fracture-Related Mortality among Older Adults in the United States:Analysis of the CDC WONDER Multiple Cause of Death Data, 1999–2013


Affiliations
1 Department of Medicine, Laredo Medical Center, 1700 East Saunders, Laredo, TX 78041, United States
 

Objectives: To examine trends in hip fracture-related mortality among older adults in the United States between 1999 and 2013. Material and Methods: The Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research system was used to identify adults aged 65 years and older with a diagnosis of hip fracture reported in their multiple cause of death record. Joinpoint regression analyses were performed to estimate the average annual percent change in hip fracture-related mortality rates by selected characteristics. Results: A total of 204, 254 older decedents listed a diagnosis of hip fracture on their death record. After age adjustment, hip fracture mortality rates decreased by −2.3% (95% CI, −2.7%, and −1.8%) in men and −1.5% (95% CI, −1.9%, and −1.1%) in women. Similarly, the proportion of in-hospital hip fracture deaths decreased annually by −2.1% (95% CI, −2.6%, and −1.5%). Of relevance, the proportion of cardiovascular diseases reported as the underlying cause of death decreased on average by −4.8% (95% CI, −5.5%, and −4.1%). Conclusions: Hip fracture-relatedmortality decreased among older adults in theUnited States. Downward trends in hip fracture-related mortality were predominantly attributed to decreased deaths among men and during hospitalization. Moreover, improvements in survival of hip fracture patientswith greater number of comorbidities may have accounted for the present findings.
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  • Hip Fracture-Related Mortality among Older Adults in the United States:Analysis of the CDC WONDER Multiple Cause of Death Data, 1999–2013

Abstract Views: 83  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Carlos H. Orces
Department of Medicine, Laredo Medical Center, 1700 East Saunders, Laredo, TX 78041, United States

Abstract


Objectives: To examine trends in hip fracture-related mortality among older adults in the United States between 1999 and 2013. Material and Methods: The Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research system was used to identify adults aged 65 years and older with a diagnosis of hip fracture reported in their multiple cause of death record. Joinpoint regression analyses were performed to estimate the average annual percent change in hip fracture-related mortality rates by selected characteristics. Results: A total of 204, 254 older decedents listed a diagnosis of hip fracture on their death record. After age adjustment, hip fracture mortality rates decreased by −2.3% (95% CI, −2.7%, and −1.8%) in men and −1.5% (95% CI, −1.9%, and −1.1%) in women. Similarly, the proportion of in-hospital hip fracture deaths decreased annually by −2.1% (95% CI, −2.6%, and −1.5%). Of relevance, the proportion of cardiovascular diseases reported as the underlying cause of death decreased on average by −4.8% (95% CI, −5.5%, and −4.1%). Conclusions: Hip fracture-relatedmortality decreased among older adults in theUnited States. Downward trends in hip fracture-related mortality were predominantly attributed to decreased deaths among men and during hospitalization. Moreover, improvements in survival of hip fracture patientswith greater number of comorbidities may have accounted for the present findings.