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Investigating the Validity of Acoustic Spectrum as a Prediction Tool for Pump Cavitation


Affiliations
1 Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
 

Cavitation in pumps causes destructive consequences; it must be detected and prevented. The aim of the present work is investigating the validity of sound spectrum as a prediction tool for pump cavitation. Results showed that; for the discrete frequencies of RF = 47.5 Hz, and BPF = 285 Hz and its second, third, and fourth harmonics of 570 Hz, 855 Hz, and 1140 Hz respectively; there are no great variations in the noise signal for the cavitation and non-cavitation conditions. For the discrete frequency of 147 Hz, there is also no great variation in the noise signal at this frequency. The only apparent result is that; the occurrence of cavitation results high energy noise signals at high frequencies from 1000 Hz to 10000 Hz. The absence of any discrete frequency to be monitored makes the sound spectrum not valid as a prediction tool for cavitation in the pumps.

Keywords

Centrifugal Pump, Cavitation, Acoustic, Blade Passing Frequency.
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  • Investigating the Validity of Acoustic Spectrum as a Prediction Tool for Pump Cavitation

Abstract Views: 145  |  PDF Views: 2

Authors

Ashraf Kotb
Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
Abdulaziz Morgan Abdulaziz
Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Abstract


Cavitation in pumps causes destructive consequences; it must be detected and prevented. The aim of the present work is investigating the validity of sound spectrum as a prediction tool for pump cavitation. Results showed that; for the discrete frequencies of RF = 47.5 Hz, and BPF = 285 Hz and its second, third, and fourth harmonics of 570 Hz, 855 Hz, and 1140 Hz respectively; there are no great variations in the noise signal for the cavitation and non-cavitation conditions. For the discrete frequency of 147 Hz, there is also no great variation in the noise signal at this frequency. The only apparent result is that; the occurrence of cavitation results high energy noise signals at high frequencies from 1000 Hz to 10000 Hz. The absence of any discrete frequency to be monitored makes the sound spectrum not valid as a prediction tool for cavitation in the pumps.

Keywords


Centrifugal Pump, Cavitation, Acoustic, Blade Passing Frequency.