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Senior High School Students’ Self-Regulated Learning Using Mobile Devices


Affiliations
1 Batangas State University, Philippines
2 Centro Escolar University, Manila, Philippines
     

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The objective of this study is to investigate how senior high school students utilize their mobile devices during self-regulated learning in chemistry, what are their attitudes toward mobile devices as a learning tool in chemistry and determine if there is a significant relationship between the frequency of usage of mobile devices as learning tool and academic performance. The research was carried out using researcher-made questionnaire distributed to 162 Grade 12 students who are currently taking up General Chemistry 2 course this second semester of AY 2018-2019. Statistical treatment of data include weighted mean and Pearson’s r. Results revealed that there is no significant relationship between frequency of mobile device usage as a learning tool during self-regulated learning and academic performance in terms of midterm grade in General Chemistry 2 course based on Pearson’s correlation coefficient of -0.057 with a corresponding p value of 0.236.


Keywords

Academic Performance, ICT in Education, Mobile Devices, Self-Regulated Learning.
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  • Senior High School Students’ Self-Regulated Learning Using Mobile Devices

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Authors

Sherryl M. Montalbo
Batangas State University, Philippines
Dennis G. Caballes
Centro Escolar University, Manila, Philippines

Abstract


The objective of this study is to investigate how senior high school students utilize their mobile devices during self-regulated learning in chemistry, what are their attitudes toward mobile devices as a learning tool in chemistry and determine if there is a significant relationship between the frequency of usage of mobile devices as learning tool and academic performance. The research was carried out using researcher-made questionnaire distributed to 162 Grade 12 students who are currently taking up General Chemistry 2 course this second semester of AY 2018-2019. Statistical treatment of data include weighted mean and Pearson’s r. Results revealed that there is no significant relationship between frequency of mobile device usage as a learning tool during self-regulated learning and academic performance in terms of midterm grade in General Chemistry 2 course based on Pearson’s correlation coefficient of -0.057 with a corresponding p value of 0.236.


Keywords


Academic Performance, ICT in Education, Mobile Devices, Self-Regulated Learning.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.36039/ciitaas%2F11%2F3%2F2019%2F182803.45-51