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Studies on Butterfly (Insecta: Lepidoptera) Diversity across Different Urban Landscapes of Delhi, India


Affiliations
1 University School of Environment Management, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Dwarka, New Delhi 110 078, India
2 Biodiversity Parks Programme, Centre for Environmental Management of Degraded Ecosystems, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India
 

The present study deals with the diversity of butterflies along with the contrasting six selected land-use types and three major seasons in Delhi for the years 2015–16 and 2016–17. Among the 40 species of butterflies recorded, family Nymphalidae (13 spp.) showed the highest species diversity. Species richness was found to be the highest during monsoon season, whereas among the six different study sites, Aravalli Biodiversity Park, New Delhi had the highest biodiversity index. Earlier studies have been confined up to species listing and documentation, whereas mathematical interpretations through biodiversity indices concerning increasing urbanization were neglected. The findings of this study indicate the significance of green patches within urban infrastructure in the cities to support a wide array of butterflies.

Keywords

Biodiversity, Butterflies, Green Areas, Landscape, Urban.
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  • Studies on Butterfly (Insecta: Lepidoptera) Diversity across Different Urban Landscapes of Delhi, India

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Authors

Monalisa Paul
University School of Environment Management, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Dwarka, New Delhi 110 078, India
Aisha Sultana
Biodiversity Parks Programme, Centre for Environmental Management of Degraded Ecosystems, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, India

Abstract


The present study deals with the diversity of butterflies along with the contrasting six selected land-use types and three major seasons in Delhi for the years 2015–16 and 2016–17. Among the 40 species of butterflies recorded, family Nymphalidae (13 spp.) showed the highest species diversity. Species richness was found to be the highest during monsoon season, whereas among the six different study sites, Aravalli Biodiversity Park, New Delhi had the highest biodiversity index. Earlier studies have been confined up to species listing and documentation, whereas mathematical interpretations through biodiversity indices concerning increasing urbanization were neglected. The findings of this study indicate the significance of green patches within urban infrastructure in the cities to support a wide array of butterflies.

Keywords


Biodiversity, Butterflies, Green Areas, Landscape, Urban.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv118%2Fi5%2F819-827