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Anticandidal Efficiency of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Extracts against Vulvovaginal Candidiasis


Affiliations
1 Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
 

The high incidence of Candidal vulvovaginitis (CVV) among pregnant women and its treatment during pregnancy is a challenge as the antifungal therapy is associated with foetal abnormalities. Additionally, various Candida species exhibit resistance to commonly used antifungal agents. Hence, there is a need to develop new therapeutic strategies against CVV. In the present study, we have evaluated the antifungal activity of cinnamon extracted by four solvents with different degrees of polarity against common Candida pathogens. The ethyl acetate extract of cinnamon was the most effective solvent extract and exhibited the highest antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candid atropicalis and Candida glabrata, with an inhibition zone diameter of 32.47, 32.1 and 16.7 mm respectively. GC-MS revealed that cinnamon ethyl acetate extract comprised of 1-phenylpropene-3.3-diol diacetate (68.5%), eugenol (11.6%), cinnamic acid (8.2%), cinnamaldehyde (6.1%) and 6-ethyl-3,4- dimethylphenol (5.4%). Minimum inhibitory concentration of cinnamon ethyl acetate extract against C. albicans and C. tropicalis was 0.5 mg/disc, while that against C. glabrata was 1 mg/disc. Minimum fungicidal concentration of cinnamon ethyl acetate extract against C. tropicalis was 1 mg/disc, while that against C. albicans and C. glabrata was 2 mg/disc respectively.

Keywords

Antifungal Activity, Candida, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Pregnant Women, Vulvovaginitis.
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  • Anticandidal Efficiency of Cinnamomum zeylanicum Extracts against Vulvovaginal Candidiasis

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Authors

Mohamed Taha Yassin
Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
Ashraf Abdel-Fattah Mostafa
Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia
Abdulaziz Abdulrahman Al-Askar
Botany and Microbiology Department, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia

Abstract


The high incidence of Candidal vulvovaginitis (CVV) among pregnant women and its treatment during pregnancy is a challenge as the antifungal therapy is associated with foetal abnormalities. Additionally, various Candida species exhibit resistance to commonly used antifungal agents. Hence, there is a need to develop new therapeutic strategies against CVV. In the present study, we have evaluated the antifungal activity of cinnamon extracted by four solvents with different degrees of polarity against common Candida pathogens. The ethyl acetate extract of cinnamon was the most effective solvent extract and exhibited the highest antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candid atropicalis and Candida glabrata, with an inhibition zone diameter of 32.47, 32.1 and 16.7 mm respectively. GC-MS revealed that cinnamon ethyl acetate extract comprised of 1-phenylpropene-3.3-diol diacetate (68.5%), eugenol (11.6%), cinnamic acid (8.2%), cinnamaldehyde (6.1%) and 6-ethyl-3,4- dimethylphenol (5.4%). Minimum inhibitory concentration of cinnamon ethyl acetate extract against C. albicans and C. tropicalis was 0.5 mg/disc, while that against C. glabrata was 1 mg/disc. Minimum fungicidal concentration of cinnamon ethyl acetate extract against C. tropicalis was 1 mg/disc, while that against C. albicans and C. glabrata was 2 mg/disc respectively.

Keywords


Antifungal Activity, Candida, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Pregnant Women, Vulvovaginitis.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv118%2Fi5%2F796-801