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Carbon Sequestration Potential of Agroforestry Systems in the Indian Arid Zone


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1 ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
 

Carbon sequestration potential of eight recommended land-use systems of arid western Rajasthan was compared. Biomass C stock was maximum in farm forestry of Acacia tortilis (31.4 Mg C ha–1) followed by Prosopis cineraria and Hardwickia binata based silvoarable systems (8.8 and 10.6 Mg C ha–1). Soil C stock was also maximum in farm forestry (47.6 Mg C ha–1) followed by Ziziphus based systems (32.5–33.9 Mg C ha–1). About 50–78% of additional soil C stock was in the form of soil inorganic carbon. The total C sequestered (biomass + soil) over a period of nineteen years was in the order: farm forestry (49.80) > silvoarable systems (11.0–13.3) > hortipasture system (8.3) > agri-horti (5.5), silvopasture (5.4) and sole pasture (5.3) compared to –1.0 Mg C ha–1 in sole cropping.

Keywords

Agroforestry, Arid Zone, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change Mitigation.
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  • Carbon Sequestration Potential of Agroforestry Systems in the Indian Arid Zone

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Authors

S. P. S. Tanwar
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
Praveen Kumar
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
Archana Verma
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
R. K. Bhatt
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
Akath Singh
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
Kanhaiya Lal
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
M. Patidar
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India
B. K. Mathur
ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342 003, India

Abstract


Carbon sequestration potential of eight recommended land-use systems of arid western Rajasthan was compared. Biomass C stock was maximum in farm forestry of Acacia tortilis (31.4 Mg C ha–1) followed by Prosopis cineraria and Hardwickia binata based silvoarable systems (8.8 and 10.6 Mg C ha–1). Soil C stock was also maximum in farm forestry (47.6 Mg C ha–1) followed by Ziziphus based systems (32.5–33.9 Mg C ha–1). About 50–78% of additional soil C stock was in the form of soil inorganic carbon. The total C sequestered (biomass + soil) over a period of nineteen years was in the order: farm forestry (49.80) > silvoarable systems (11.0–13.3) > hortipasture system (8.3) > agri-horti (5.5), silvopasture (5.4) and sole pasture (5.3) compared to –1.0 Mg C ha–1 in sole cropping.

Keywords


Agroforestry, Arid Zone, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change Mitigation.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi12%2F2014-2022