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Foreword


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1 Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, India
 

If one were to select a single most important discovery of science, the atomic hypothesis, i.e. that all things are made of atoms, would be a strong contender. Hindu and Greek philosophers have discussed atoms for long as a fundamental unit. However, their ancient science divided everything into five elements (panchabutha): earth (solid), water (liquid), fire, air (gas) and space (vacuum).
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  • Foreword

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Authors

E. Arunan
Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, India

Abstract


If one were to select a single most important discovery of science, the atomic hypothesis, i.e. that all things are made of atoms, would be a strong contender. Hindu and Greek philosophers have discussed atoms for long as a fundamental unit. However, their ancient science divided everything into five elements (panchabutha): earth (solid), water (liquid), fire, air (gas) and space (vacuum).

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi12%2F1962-1962