Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Recent Underwater Investigations at Takashima:Searching for the Lost Fleet of the Mongol Empire


Affiliations
1 University of the Ryukyus, College of Law and Letters, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-town, Nakagami-District, Okinawa, Japan
2 Kyushu National Museum, Museum Science Division, 4-7-2 Ishizaka, Dazaifu-City, Fukuoka, Japan
3 Tokai University, School of Marine Science and Technology, 3-20-1 Orido, Shimizu, Shizuoka-City, Shizuoka, Japan
 

Two vessels originating in China, which are related to the 13th century CE Mongol invasion of Japan, were recently discovered at Takashima underwater site in Nagasaki Prefecture. These finds have shed new light on naval tactics and how the event took place. The finds are thought to be one of the most famous underwater archaeological discoveries in the country. Realizing the significance and potential of the underwater cultural heritage, the national government has initiated organized efforts in the field of maritime and underwater archaeology of Japan.

Keywords

Imari Bay, Khublai Khan, Mongol, Takashima, Quanzhou Ships.
User
Notifications
Font Size

  • Delgado, J., Khubilai Khan’s Lost Fleet: in Search of a Legendary Armada, University of California Press, Berkeley, 2008.
  • Takano, S., The research results of Japanese underwater archaeology from Takashima Island. Archaeol. Quarterly, 2013, 123, 34– 36 (in Japanese).
  • Rossabi, M., Khubilai Khan: His Life and Times, University of California Press, Berkeley, 1988.
  • Saeki, K., Mongol Shurai no Shyogeki (The Impact of the Mongol invasion), Chuo Koron Shinsya, Tokyo, 2003 (in Japanese).
  • Koga, N., Gengawa no Shiryo ni yoru Koan Matsuura Eki (A study of the second Mongol invasion from the Yuan sources). Matsuura to Kenkyu, 1982, 5, 81–98 (in Japanese).
  • Mozai, T., The lost fleet of Kublai Khan. Natl. Geographic, 1982, 162(5), 634–649.
  • Matsuura Board of Education, Matsuura city Takashima underwater site – summary of research: Matsuura city cultural property investigation Report No. 4, Matsuura Board of Education, Matsuura, 2011 (in Japanese).
  • Matsuura Board of Education, Matsuura city Takashima underwater site: Matsuura city cultural property investigation report no. 2, Matsuura Board of Education, Matsuura 2008 (in Japanese).
  • Sasaki, R., The Origins of the Lost Fleet of the Mongol Empire, Texas A&M University Press, College Station, 2015.
  • Ikeda, Y., Nikon ni Okeru Suichu Iseki Chosa Kenkyu no Genjyo – Takashima Kaitei Iseki ni Okeru Genngunn-sen no Chosa wo Chushin ni (The current state of research of underwater site in Japan – focusing on the research of the Mongol invasion shipwrecks at Takashima underwater site). In Suichi Iseri no RekishiGaku (Historical Study of Underwater Site) (ed. Sato, M.), Yamakawa Publishing Co, Tokyo, 2018, pp. 13–42 (in Japanese).
  • Ikeda, Y., Final Report of 2006–2010 Grant-in-Aid for scientific research (S); grasping and analyzing Mongolian-expeditionrelated archaeological sites and remains on the seabed of Takashima, 2012 (in Japanese).
  • Guidelines for the protection of the underwater archaeological sites in Japan, The Agency for Cultural Affairs, Tokyo, 2017.
  • Ikeda, Y., The research and study of the shipwrecks at the Mongol invasions using the underwater archaeological method. Final Report of 2011–2015, 2016 (in Japanese).
  • Kimura, J., Archaeology of East Asian Shipbuilding, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, 2016.
  • Cultural Relics Bureau of Penglai City, Penglai Gu Chuan (ancient ships of Penglai), Cultural Relics Publishing House, Penglai, 2006 (in Chinese).
  • National Maritime Museum of Korea, The Sinan wreck I, Cultural Heritage Administration, Seoul, 2006.
  • Green, J. and Burningham., N., The ship from Quanzhou, Fujian province, People’s Republic of China. Int. J. Naut. Archaeol., 1998, 27, 277–301.
  • Hattori, H. Moko Shurai (the Mongol Invasion), Yamakawa Publishing Co, Tokyo, 2014.

Abstract Views: 6

PDF Views: 0




  • Recent Underwater Investigations at Takashima:Searching for the Lost Fleet of the Mongol Empire

Abstract Views: 6  |  PDF Views: 0

Authors

Ikeda Yoshifumi
University of the Ryukyus, College of Law and Letters, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara-town, Nakagami-District, Okinawa, Japan
Randy Sasaki
Kyushu National Museum, Museum Science Division, 4-7-2 Ishizaka, Dazaifu-City, Fukuoka, Japan
Jun Kimura
Tokai University, School of Marine Science and Technology, 3-20-1 Orido, Shimizu, Shizuoka-City, Shizuoka, Japan

Abstract


Two vessels originating in China, which are related to the 13th century CE Mongol invasion of Japan, were recently discovered at Takashima underwater site in Nagasaki Prefecture. These finds have shed new light on naval tactics and how the event took place. The finds are thought to be one of the most famous underwater archaeological discoveries in the country. Realizing the significance and potential of the underwater cultural heritage, the national government has initiated organized efforts in the field of maritime and underwater archaeology of Japan.

Keywords


Imari Bay, Khublai Khan, Mongol, Takashima, Quanzhou Ships.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi10%2F1635-1639