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Metal Detection:An Essential Aid in Maritime Archaeology


Affiliations
1 Department of Maritime Archaeology, WA Shipwreck Museum, Cliff St. Fremantle, 6160,, Australia
 

Metal detection has proven itself to be an essential adjunct to the human eye in the non-disturbance location and assessment of archaeological deposits where metals exist. It can also assist greatly during excavation and in post excavation management strategies. Relating experiences in Australia over the course of several decades helps explain why the method has been slow in being more broadly accepted as an archaeological tool and in some instances misunderstood by many archaeologists. These experiences illustrate why it is essential for historical and maritime archaeologists to avail themselves of the tool.

Keywords

Magnetometer, Metal Detection, Remote Sensing, Vergulde Draeck, Zuytdorp.
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  • Metal Detection:An Essential Aid in Maritime Archaeology

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Authors

M. McCarthy
Department of Maritime Archaeology, WA Shipwreck Museum, Cliff St. Fremantle, 6160,, Australia

Abstract


Metal detection has proven itself to be an essential adjunct to the human eye in the non-disturbance location and assessment of archaeological deposits where metals exist. It can also assist greatly during excavation and in post excavation management strategies. Relating experiences in Australia over the course of several decades helps explain why the method has been slow in being more broadly accepted as an archaeological tool and in some instances misunderstood by many archaeologists. These experiences illustrate why it is essential for historical and maritime archaeologists to avail themselves of the tool.

Keywords


Magnetometer, Metal Detection, Remote Sensing, Vergulde Draeck, Zuytdorp.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi10%2F1629-1634