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Living Museums in the Sea:The Past, Present and Future of Underwater Cultural Heritage Preservation


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1 Indiana University Center for Underwater Science, 1025 E. 7th St. SPHB058, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States
 

The living museums in the sea (LMS) is a conservation model that promotes the study and protection of submerged cultural resources while encouraging ecological resiliency, public outreach and sustainable tourism. In collaboration with local, national and international stakeholders, Indiana University established the first network of LMS sites in the southeastern Dominican Republic in 2011 – including Captain Kidd’s 1699 CE Quedagh Merchant, and is currently working to establish a second network of sites in Punta Cana. This article discusses the challenges and successes associated with management of these marine protected areas, photogrammetric monitoring techniques and ongoing interdisciplinary research.

Keywords

Dominican Republic, Living Museums in the Sea, Photogrammetry, Punta Cana, Quedagh Merchant.
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  • Living Museums in the Sea:The Past, Present and Future of Underwater Cultural Heritage Preservation

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Authors

Kirsten Hawley
Indiana University Center for Underwater Science, 1025 E. 7th St. SPHB058, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States
Charles D. Beeker
Indiana University Center for Underwater Science, 1025 E. 7th St. SPHB058, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States
Samuel Haskell
Indiana University Center for Underwater Science, 1025 E. 7th St. SPHB058, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States
Matthew Maus
Indiana University Center for Underwater Science, 1025 E. 7th St. SPHB058, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States

Abstract


The living museums in the sea (LMS) is a conservation model that promotes the study and protection of submerged cultural resources while encouraging ecological resiliency, public outreach and sustainable tourism. In collaboration with local, national and international stakeholders, Indiana University established the first network of LMS sites in the southeastern Dominican Republic in 2011 – including Captain Kidd’s 1699 CE Quedagh Merchant, and is currently working to establish a second network of sites in Punta Cana. This article discusses the challenges and successes associated with management of these marine protected areas, photogrammetric monitoring techniques and ongoing interdisciplinary research.

Keywords


Dominican Republic, Living Museums in the Sea, Photogrammetry, Punta Cana, Quedagh Merchant.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi10%2F1612-1616