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Limited Replication Studies in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research on Taste and Food


Affiliations
1 Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Applied Oral Sciences and Community Dental Care, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
 

There have been many functional magnetic resonance imaging studies on taste and food. However, it is largely unknown if the findings have been replicated, or are replicable. The current survey evaluated 1568 articles on this topic, identified by Web of Science Core Collection database. Results revealed that only 0.7% of the articles were replication studies. Most of them were conceptual replications. The success rate of replication studies conducted by some of the authors coming from the original studies was 1.7 times higher than that of independent replication studies.

Keywords

Content Analysis, Food, Highly Cited Articles, Neuroimaging, Odour, Replication, Taste.
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  • Limited Replication Studies in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research on Taste and Food

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Authors

Andy Wai Kan Yeung
Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Applied Oral Sciences and Community Dental Care, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Abstract


There have been many functional magnetic resonance imaging studies on taste and food. However, it is largely unknown if the findings have been replicated, or are replicable. The current survey evaluated 1568 articles on this topic, identified by Web of Science Core Collection database. Results revealed that only 0.7% of the articles were replication studies. Most of them were conceptual replications. The success rate of replication studies conducted by some of the authors coming from the original studies was 1.7 times higher than that of independent replication studies.

Keywords


Content Analysis, Food, Highly Cited Articles, Neuroimaging, Odour, Replication, Taste.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi8%2F1345-1347