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Green Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Activity of Synthesized Ruthenium Nanoparticles using Fishtail Fern, Sago Palm, Rosy Periwinkle and Holy Basil


Affiliations
1 Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
2 Department of Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
 

Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of different sizes prepared using leaf extracts of fishtail fern (Nephrole-pis biserrata), sago palm (Cycas revoluta), rosy periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) and holy basil (Oci-mum tenuiflorum) in methanol exhibited pronounced antifungal (against Aspergillus flavus) and antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS, SO, OH). The synthesized Ru NPs were characterized using FTIR, UV-visible spectra, fluorescence and XRD. A tentative synthetic mechanism of NPs has been hypothesized via redox mechanism. A correlation between size of nano-particles and plant groups has also been established.

Keywords

Antifungal, Antioxidant, Biosynthesis, Nano-Particles, Ruthenium.
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  • Green Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Activity of Synthesized Ruthenium Nanoparticles using Fishtail Fern, Sago Palm, Rosy Periwinkle and Holy Basil

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Authors

Pranshu K. Gupta
Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
Kalluri V. S. Ranganath
Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
Nawal K. Dubey
Department of Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India
Lallan Mishra
Department of Chemistry, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India

Abstract


Ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) of different sizes prepared using leaf extracts of fishtail fern (Nephrole-pis biserrata), sago palm (Cycas revoluta), rosy periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) and holy basil (Oci-mum tenuiflorum) in methanol exhibited pronounced antifungal (against Aspergillus flavus) and antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS, SO, OH). The synthesized Ru NPs were characterized using FTIR, UV-visible spectra, fluorescence and XRD. A tentative synthetic mechanism of NPs has been hypothesized via redox mechanism. A correlation between size of nano-particles and plant groups has also been established.

Keywords


Antifungal, Antioxidant, Biosynthesis, Nano-Particles, Ruthenium.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv117%2Fi8%2F1308-1317