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Cotton Crop in Changing Climate


Affiliations
1 School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi - 110067, India
2 DCAC, Delhi University, New Delhi - 110023, India
3 India Meteorological Department, New Delhi - 110003, India
4 Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar - 125004, India
 

Cotton is a major cash crop of global significance. It has a peculiar and inherent growth pattern with coinciding physiological growth stages. This study is based upon modelling and simulation for Hisar region. Stage-wise water stress has been quantified for three Bt-cotton cultivars with three sowing dates under both irrigated and non-irrigated (rainfed) conditions to assess the most sensitive stage. As per model output, it was observed that, at some stages stress value during excess years remains below 0.3 which is characterized as mild stress, in contrast with drought years where it is above 0.3, impacting potential crop productivity. Thus, rainfall impacts the productivity of cotton even in irrigated semi-arid region. Irrigation measures practiced, could partially alleviate influence of stress. Also, early sowing is found beneficial. The most water-sensitive period is ball formation and maturity stage followed by flowering stage.

Keywords

Cotton, Irrigation, Temperature, Water.
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  • Cotton Crop in Changing Climate

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Authors

A. Shikha
School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi - 110067, India
P. Maharana
DCAC, Delhi University, New Delhi - 110023, India
K. K. Singh
India Meteorological Department, New Delhi - 110003, India
A. P. Dimri
School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi - 110067, India
R. Niwas
Chaudhary Charan Singh Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar - 125004, India

Abstract


Cotton is a major cash crop of global significance. It has a peculiar and inherent growth pattern with coinciding physiological growth stages. This study is based upon modelling and simulation for Hisar region. Stage-wise water stress has been quantified for three Bt-cotton cultivars with three sowing dates under both irrigated and non-irrigated (rainfed) conditions to assess the most sensitive stage. As per model output, it was observed that, at some stages stress value during excess years remains below 0.3 which is characterized as mild stress, in contrast with drought years where it is above 0.3, impacting potential crop productivity. Thus, rainfall impacts the productivity of cotton even in irrigated semi-arid region. Irrigation measures practiced, could partially alleviate influence of stress. Also, early sowing is found beneficial. The most water-sensitive period is ball formation and maturity stage followed by flowering stage.

Keywords


Cotton, Irrigation, Temperature, Water.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv115%2Fi5%2F948-954