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Agronomic Biofortification of Zinc in Wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.)


Affiliations
1 Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India
 

Zinc malnutrition poses a major health issue for human beings globally. Agronomic bio-fortification explores the feasibility to control the zinc deficiency related disorders of the human population. Field experiment was conducted in a red and lateritic soil of Ranchi on 23 wheat cultivars with soil and foliar applications of ZnSO4 ⋅ 7H2O. Zinc content of wheat grain increased from 38.86 to 77.17 mg/kg with soil application and to 76.49 mg/kg with soil + foliar application of Zn. Total Zn uptake by wheat (grain + straw) cultivars with soil + foliar application of Zn was significantly higher in short (933 g/ha) and long (960 g/ha) duration cultivars compared to that with soil application. Apparent Zn recovery in wheat also improved with soil + foliar application of Zn fertilizer, suggested that agronomic bio-fortification of zinc is possible in wheat and can prevent Zn malnutrition in human beings to a considerable extent.

Keywords

Agronomic, Biofortification, Triticum Aestivum L., Red And Lateritic Soil, Zinc Deficiency.
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  • Agronomic Biofortification of Zinc in Wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.)

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Authors

Arvind Kumar
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India
Manas Denre
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India
Ruplal Prasad
Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Birsa Agricultural University, Kanke, Ranchi - 834006, India

Abstract


Zinc malnutrition poses a major health issue for human beings globally. Agronomic bio-fortification explores the feasibility to control the zinc deficiency related disorders of the human population. Field experiment was conducted in a red and lateritic soil of Ranchi on 23 wheat cultivars with soil and foliar applications of ZnSO4 ⋅ 7H2O. Zinc content of wheat grain increased from 38.86 to 77.17 mg/kg with soil application and to 76.49 mg/kg with soil + foliar application of Zn. Total Zn uptake by wheat (grain + straw) cultivars with soil + foliar application of Zn was significantly higher in short (933 g/ha) and long (960 g/ha) duration cultivars compared to that with soil application. Apparent Zn recovery in wheat also improved with soil + foliar application of Zn fertilizer, suggested that agronomic bio-fortification of zinc is possible in wheat and can prevent Zn malnutrition in human beings to a considerable extent.

Keywords


Agronomic, Biofortification, Triticum Aestivum L., Red And Lateritic Soil, Zinc Deficiency.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv115%2Fi5%2F944-948