Open Access Open Access  Restricted Access Subscription Access

Sustainable Exploitation of Building Stone in India–Emerging Issues


Affiliations
1 Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad - 826004, India
 

Stone aggregates are one of the most important construction materials obtained through conventional mining and crushing of building stones. The construction mining sector is highly unorganized, despite alarm calls raised by individuals and corporates regarding high accident rates and rapidly declining stone deposits. We may soon run out of quality stone deposits to support our aspiring infrastructure development plans. This article aims to create awareness on the importance of stone quarrying in supporting our infrastructure development plans, challenges faced by this sector, and eliciting appropriate and concrete action plans for the future.

Keywords

Construction Aggregates, Health, Safety, Stone Quarry, Sustainability.
User
Notifications
Font Size

  • Khaleej Times, cIndian Engineering, 22 November 2016.
  • Ananthamurthy, B. S. and Sharma, A., Mining for sustainable growth of Indian construction industry. In Proceedings of the Golden Jubilee Seminar on Mining Technology for Sustainable Development, MineTech’11, Raipur, 2011, pp. 29–139.
  • Central Electricity Authority, Ministry of Power, Government of India (GoI). National Electricity Plan 2016, December 2016.
  • Planning Commission, GoI, Twelfth Five Year Plan (2012-2017), Faster. More Inclusive and Sustainable Growth, Vol. I, II, Sage Publication India Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 2013.
  • Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India, Ministry of Home Affairs, GoI, SRS Statistical Report 2011, Census of India 2011, New Delhi, 2013.
  • Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu India Pvt Ltd, Infrastructure and construction sectors building the nation, New Delhi, 2014.
  • Pangariya, A., Budget 2016–17 and the Indian economy. Presentation by Niti Aayog to the GoI, New Delhi, 2016.
  • Ministry of Finance, GoI, Union Budget for 2017–18, New Delhi, 2017.
  • Haryana Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 2012.
  • Rajasthan Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 2017.
  • Gujarat Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 2016.
  • Maharashtra Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 2015.
  • Karnataka Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 2016.
  • Tamil Nadu Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 1959.
  • Andhra Pradesh Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 1966.
  • Madhya Pradesh Minor Mineral Concession Rules, 1996.
  • Sishodiya, P. K., Nandi, S. S. and Dhatrak, S. V., Report on detection of silicosis among stone mine workers from Karauli district – Report I. National Institute of Miners’ Health, Nagpur, 2011.
  • Ahmad, A., A study of sandstone miners: notes from the field. Int. J. Med. Sci. Public Health, 2015, 4, 433–434.
  • Sishodiya, P. K., Nandi, S. S. and Dhatrak, S. V., Report on Detection of silicosis among stone mine workers from Karauli district – report II. National Institute of Miners’ Health, Nagpur, 2014.
  • Supreme Court of India, Record of Proceedings, Writ Petition(s) (Civil) No(s). 110/2006, People’s Rights & Social Res. Centre and Others versus Union of India and others.
  • Mines Rules, 1955; Mines Act 1952, Directorate General of Safety, Government of India.
  • Naik, P., Ushamalini and Somashekar, R. K., Noise pollution in stone quarrying industry – a case study in Bangalore district, Karnataka, India. J. Ind. Pollut. Control, 2007, 23(1), 43–48.
  • Madhavan, P. and Raj, S., Budhpura ‘ground zero’ sandstone quarrying in India, A report on study commissioned by India Committee of the Netherlands, 2005.
  • Gayatri, G., No mining from tomorrow. The Tribune (online edition), 27 February 2010.
  • Economic Survey of Haryana, 2015-16, Department of Economics and Statistical Analysis, Government of Haryana, pp. 58–67.
  • Glocal Research and India Committee of the Netherlands, Rock Bottom – Modern Slavery and Child Labour in South Indian Granite Quarries. India Committee of the Netherlands, May 2015.
  • Marshall, S., Taylor, K. and Balaton-Chrimes, S., Rajasthan stone quarries-promoting human rights due diligence and access to redress in complex supply chains. Corporate Accountability Research, Non-Judicial Redress Mechanisms Report Series 11, 2016.
  • Elgstrand, E. K. and Vingard, E., Occupational safety and health in mining, Anthology on the Situation in 16 Mining Countries, Univeristy of Gothenberg, Sweden, 2013.
  • Health and Safety Authority, Safe Quarry, Guidelines to the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Quarries) Regulations, Ireland, 2008.

Abstract Views: 8

PDF Views: 1




  • Sustainable Exploitation of Building Stone in India–Emerging Issues

Abstract Views: 8  |  PDF Views: 1

Authors

Abhishek Sharma
Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad - 826004, India
A. K. Mishra
Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad - 826004, India
B. S. Choudhary
Department of Mining Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad - 826004, India

Abstract


Stone aggregates are one of the most important construction materials obtained through conventional mining and crushing of building stones. The construction mining sector is highly unorganized, despite alarm calls raised by individuals and corporates regarding high accident rates and rapidly declining stone deposits. We may soon run out of quality stone deposits to support our aspiring infrastructure development plans. This article aims to create awareness on the importance of stone quarrying in supporting our infrastructure development plans, challenges faced by this sector, and eliciting appropriate and concrete action plans for the future.

Keywords


Construction Aggregates, Health, Safety, Stone Quarry, Sustainability.

References





DOI: https://doi.org/10.18520/cs%2Fv115%2Fi5%2F838-844