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Calcium and Vitamin D Supplement Prescribing Practices among Providers Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders:Are We Addressing Bone Health?


Affiliations
1 Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
2 Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States
 

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have several risk factors for low bone mineral density. The gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF) diet is a complementary therapy sometimes used in ASD that raises concerns for the adequacy of calcium and vitamin D intake. This study evaluated the prescribing practices of calcium and vitamin D supplements and the practice of checking 25- hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by providers in 100 children with ASD, 50 of whom were on the GFCF diet. Fifty-two percent and 46% of children on the GFCF diet were on some form of vitamin D and calcium supplements, respectively, compared to 18% and 14% of those not on this diet. Twenty-four percent of children in the GFCF group had a documented 25(OH)D level compared to none in the non-GFCF group. The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OH)D levels.
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  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplement Prescribing Practices among Providers Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders:Are We Addressing Bone Health?

Abstract Views: 58  |  PDF Views: 24

Authors

Shylaja Srinivasan
Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
Julia O’Rourke
Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States
Sara Bersche Golas
Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States
Ann Neumeyer
Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States
Madhusmita Misra
Pediatric Endocrinology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States

Abstract


Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have several risk factors for low bone mineral density. The gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF) diet is a complementary therapy sometimes used in ASD that raises concerns for the adequacy of calcium and vitamin D intake. This study evaluated the prescribing practices of calcium and vitamin D supplements and the practice of checking 25- hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels by providers in 100 children with ASD, 50 of whom were on the GFCF diet. Fifty-two percent and 46% of children on the GFCF diet were on some form of vitamin D and calcium supplements, respectively, compared to 18% and 14% of those not on this diet. Twenty-four percent of children in the GFCF group had a documented 25(OH)D level compared to none in the non-GFCF group. The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OH)D levels.