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The Right to Food Debates Social Protection for Food Security in India


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1 Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, Pune 411004., India
     

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This book compiles debates on the subject and is divided in four parts. The first part is introductory and relates to concepts, scope and Indian food security from the starting points of issues relating to Food Security Act. It is shown why poor people in rural areas could not avail the public work, food and nutrition programme that had been existence in varying forms since the 1960s and 1970s. People’s Union for Civil Liberties filed public interest litigation in the Supreme Court on behalf of the public who could not avail of the services and died of hunger. After that the court ordered the government to provide the required services. This book provides answers different questions relating to food security which were elaborated by the policy makers, academic advisory bodies and civil societies. This part describes why there was a need for a law regarding the right to food for the poor, specifically in rural areas. Swain and Kumaran in 2012 found in their survey of public distribution system and Integrated Child Development Services programme that the poor people are denied access to these services due to discrimination on the basis of caste, gender and religion. In the ration shops they found that the lower quantities of foodgrains were distributed and charged high. This part also discusses the judgments of the Supreme Court under Article 21.
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  • The Right to Food Debates Social Protection for Food Security in India

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Authors

Anil S. Memane
Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics, Pune 411004., India

Abstract


This book compiles debates on the subject and is divided in four parts. The first part is introductory and relates to concepts, scope and Indian food security from the starting points of issues relating to Food Security Act. It is shown why poor people in rural areas could not avail the public work, food and nutrition programme that had been existence in varying forms since the 1960s and 1970s. People’s Union for Civil Liberties filed public interest litigation in the Supreme Court on behalf of the public who could not avail of the services and died of hunger. After that the court ordered the government to provide the required services. This book provides answers different questions relating to food security which were elaborated by the policy makers, academic advisory bodies and civil societies. This part describes why there was a need for a law regarding the right to food for the poor, specifically in rural areas. Swain and Kumaran in 2012 found in their survey of public distribution system and Integrated Child Development Services programme that the poor people are denied access to these services due to discrimination on the basis of caste, gender and religion. In the ration shops they found that the lower quantities of foodgrains were distributed and charged high. This part also discusses the judgments of the Supreme Court under Article 21.


DOI: https://doi.org/10.21648/arthavij%2F2019%2Fv61%2Fi2%2F183616