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Does Healthcare System in Kerala Need a Change? Emerging Patterns of Morbidly and Hospitalisation


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1 Francis Institute of Management and Research, Borivali, Mumbai 400103, Maharashtra, India
2 Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Deonar, Mumbai 400088, Maharashtra, India
     

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Although the ‘Kerala Model’ is often viewed as a rare combination of higherorder human development and not so discernible patterns of consistent exponential economic growth, it appears that in recent times the health system in Kerala has been facing the emerging crisis in public health. This paper assesses the determinants of morbidity and hospitalisation here using NSSO 71st round data. While we compare the results with the extant literature, drawing cues from the results, we explore public policy options that are appropriate to the context of Kerala. Moreover, the paper also examines the disease profile of hospitalized households.
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  • Does Healthcare System in Kerala Need a Change? Emerging Patterns of Morbidly and Hospitalisation

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Authors

K. R. Sinimole
Francis Institute of Management and Research, Borivali, Mumbai 400103, Maharashtra, India
G. D. Bino Paul
Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Deonar, Mumbai 400088, Maharashtra, India
M. Sivakami
Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Deonar, Mumbai 400088, Maharashtra, India

Abstract


Although the ‘Kerala Model’ is often viewed as a rare combination of higherorder human development and not so discernible patterns of consistent exponential economic growth, it appears that in recent times the health system in Kerala has been facing the emerging crisis in public health. This paper assesses the determinants of morbidity and hospitalisation here using NSSO 71st round data. While we compare the results with the extant literature, drawing cues from the results, we explore public policy options that are appropriate to the context of Kerala. Moreover, the paper also examines the disease profile of hospitalized households.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.21648/arthavij%2F2019%2Fv61%2Fi1%2F180158